Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have multiple record having similar id. The database is very much legacy. There is no such unique column. Created date column is used for keeping the timestamp of creation of row in database. I have to keep the record in java map for doing some operation. For any change in record, it creates new record. I don't want to keep all fields inside hashcode and equals. Because, i am not sure which column is change against an id.

First, i try with random number generator to unique hashcode. It works.

Second, i have decided to put the created date column in hashcode. It works also.

Is there any disadvantage to put the date in hashcode?

share|improve this question
    
hashCode is used by hash-based collections in java. They must be different for hash-based collections to work faster. So if you want to know more of hashmap,hashset please cover my tutorials –  Volodymyr Levytskyi Jul 29 '13 at 13:57
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The hashCode and equals should uses the same fields, and those fields should be effectively immutable (i.e. are not changed after adding to a hashed collections)

This can include a date or any field you like.

BTW I prefer to use long instead of Date because I can make it immutable and it is marginally faster.

If you are going to use an timestamp as an id, you can also ensure it is unique by pushing up the milli-seconds (or micro-seconds if you can store such a time stamp)

private static final AtomicLong TIME_STAMP = new AtomicLong();
// can have up to 1000 ids per second.
public static long getUniqueMillis() {
    long now = System.currentTimeMillis();
    while (true) {
        long last = TIME_STAMP.get();
        if (now <= last)
            now = last + 1;
        if (TIME_STAMP.compareAndSet(last, now))
            return now;
    }
}

or

private static final AtomicLong TIME_STAMP = new AtomicLong();
// can have up to 1000000 ids per second.
public static long getUniqueMicros() {
    long now = System.currentTimeMillis() * 1000;
    while (true) {
        long last = TIME_STAMP.get();
        if (now <= last)
            now = last + 1;
        if (TIME_STAMP.compareAndSet(last, now))
            return now;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

If you put something in a Map then I assume you want to later fetch it with the key. HashCode() of the key is used to identify what bucket the element belongs to. Then the equals() method is used on all the elements in the bucket to find the match. By having a random number generator for the hashcode() you will not be able to find the key in the map since the hashcode() function should return identical value every time if the key hasn't changed.

share|improve this answer
add comment

First of all, you only need equals() and hashCode() methods if you use these objects as keys in a HashMap.

There must be some notion that determines what it means for these objects to be "equal" to one another. You must implement your equals() and hashCode() methods in a way that reflects this notion.

Using random numbers for hash codes is a bad idea, unless equals() always returns false (so, no two object are ever equal to each other). And even then you must ofcourse not return a new random number each time hashCode() is called (that would lead to strange errors when you'd store the objects in a hash-based collection).

There's no problem in using the date as part of the hashCode() calculation, as long as it's one of the criteria that determines if two objects are equal to each other.

share|improve this answer
    
Or a HashSet (which, admitted is a HashMap with a Set façade). –  Boris the Spider Jul 29 '13 at 8:05
1  
@BoristheSpider Or any other hash-based collection. –  Jesper Jul 29 '13 at 8:09
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.