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I have a Class that is used as an extender by several other Classes, and in one instance, a method from the parent Class needs to call back to a method from the child Class. Is there a way of doing this?

I realise PHP contains abstract Classes and functions, but would require each child Class to have the declared abstract function(s), which I do not require in this case.

For example (these are examples, not real life) -

Class parent{

    function on_save_changes(){

        some_parent_function();

        if($_POST['condition'] === 'A') :
            // Call 'child_1_action()'
        elseif($_POST['condition'] === 'B') :
            // Call 'child_2_action()'
        endif       

        some_other_parent_function();

    }

    function some_parent_function(){
        // Do something here, required by multiple child Classes
    }

}

Class child_1 Extends parent{

    function __construct(){
        $this->on_save_changes();
    }

    function child_1_action(){
        // Do something here, only every required by this child Class
    }

}

Class child_2 Extends parent{

    function __construct(){
        $this->on_save_changes();
    }

    function child_2_action(){
        // Do something here, only every required by this child Class
    }

}
share|improve this question
2  
There's another thread in stackoverflow with the same query: stackoverflow.com/questions/1944827/… –  maxxon15 Jul 29 '13 at 8:44
    
Please see the second paragraph of my question that explains why, in this case, that answer is not right for me. –  David Gard Jul 29 '13 at 8:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can do this by just simply calling the child method, e.g.:

if($_POST['condition'] === 'A') :
    $this->some_parent_function();
    $this->child_1_action();

However, you should avoid doing this. Putting checks in the parent that call methods only existing in a child class is a very bad design smell. There is always a way to do things in a more structured manner by utilizing well-known design patterns or simply thinking the class hierarchy through better.

A very simple solution you can consider is implementing all of these methods in the parent class as no-ops; each child class can override (and provide implementation for) the method that it's interested in. This is a somewhat mechanical solution so there's no way to know if it's indeed the best approach in your case, but even so it's much better than cold-calling methods that technically are not guaranteed to exist.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the bad design smell hint. –  moonwave99 Jul 29 '13 at 8:53
    
Thanks for your reply. Calling child method direct from the parent does not work (Call to undefined method error). I think what I'll do in this case is overwrite the on_save_changes() method. I'll have to duplicate some functionality to start with, but I appreciate what you are saying about looking to structure the Classes in a better way. –  David Gard Jul 29 '13 at 9:03
    
@DavidGard: If you get such an error that means you are trying to call the method on the wrong type of child object. Although this is definitely a bug in the calling logic (or in the child class that should implement a method but did not) that can be fixed, it is also the exact reason why you should not be doing this in the first place. –  Jon Jul 29 '13 at 9:07

Try this:

class ParentClass{

    private $childActionMethod;

    public function on_save_changes(){
        if(method_exists($this, $this->childActionMethod)) {
            call_user_func_array(array($this, $this->childActionMethod), func_get_args());
        }
        else {
            throw new Exception('Child Method has not been set');
        }
    }

    protected function setChildActionMethod($methodName) {
        $this->childActionMethod = $methodName;
    }
}

class ChildClass1 extends ParentClass{

    function __construct(){
        $this->setChildActionMethod('child_1_action');
    }

    function child_1_action(){
        echo('Hello First World<br />');
    }
}

class ChildClass2 extends ParentClass{

    function __construct(){
        $this->setChildActionMethod('child_2_action');
    }

    function child_2_action(){
        echo('Hello Second World<br />');
    }
}

$child1 = new ChildClass1();
$child1->on_save_changes();
// Hello First World

$child2 = new ChildClass2();
$child2->on_save_changes();
// Hello Second World

The parent class has the protected method setChildActionMethod, callable by the children. When the children are instantiated, they tell the parent the name of the method they would like it to call on save.

If the method exists then it is called with any arguments, or it throws an exception (you can change the error handling).

I'm sure theres a name for this pattern, but I am unsure what it is called.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting way of approaching it. While technically I think that would work, I'd prefer to avoid if possible, as it is a bit messy. Thanks for the tip though. –  David Gard Jul 29 '13 at 9:20
    
You won't find a clean solution for this, parent classes aren't supposed to know anything about derived classes other than the 'existence' of the properties and methods it declared itself. –  Flosculus Jul 29 '13 at 9:25

You may use "Template method" pattern, if you need to create some action sequence in parent that child classes should implement on their own but in some predefined manner. But you should avoid referring to future defined arbitrary methods.

In general: any method you use in your parent should be declared either as abstract or have default implementation. Children will override these methods.

abstract class parent{
  function on_save_changes(){
    some_parent_function();
    some_child_action();
    some_other_parent_function(); // added to follow changes of question
  }

  function some_parent_function(){
    // Do something here, required by multiple child Classes
  }

  abstract public function some_child_action();

}

class child_1 Extends parent{
  function some_child__action(){
    if($_POST['condition'] === 'A') : 
      // Do something here, only every required by this child Class
    endif;
   }
}

class child_2 Extends parent{
  function some_child_action(){
    if($_POST['condition'] === 'B') :
      // Do something here, only every required by this child Class
    endif; 
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But I should notice that even in this case it's bad design because of mixing class hierarchy with explicit branching inside. –  dmitry Jul 29 '13 at 8:58
    
Thanks for the reply. So in this case I'd have to go child->parent->child->parent to get the functionality I require? Technically it would work, so I'll have a think about this technique... –  David Gard Jul 29 '13 at 9:08
    
Do you understand what is abstract method? Just to be sure. You create template (on_save_changes), with some skeleton of logic, and all methods you cannot implement in parent you just make abstract and leave to be implemented by children. That is "Template method" pattern. –  dmitry Jul 29 '13 at 9:10
    
I believe so, yes, although I freely admit to not being an expert on the subject (hence the question). I've just made an edit to my question, which actually renders my initial comment somewhat null. I'll have to do some restructuring to get this to work, but to be honest I don't think that's a bad thing at this point. –  David Gard Jul 29 '13 at 9:17
    
It might help if you described what is your task with some context. Program design is the most sensitive and hard discipline in CS, so, it is always room to learn something new there. Bad design decision is much worse than just a programming error like wrong datastructure or type, so think twice :) –  dmitry Jul 29 '13 at 9:21

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