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So, I'm sure this has been answered somewhere out there before, but I couldn't find it anywhere. Hoping some generics guru can help.

    public interface IAnimal{}
    public class Orangutan:IAnimal{}

    public void ValidateUsing<T>(Action<T> action) where T : IAnimal
    {
        Orangutan orangutan = new Orangutan();
        action(orangutan);  //Compile error 1

        //This doesn't work either:
        IAnimal animal = new Orangutan();
        action(animal);  //Compile error 2
    }
  1. Argument type 'Orangutan' is not assignable to parameter type 'T'
  2. Argument type 'IAnimal' is not assignable to parameter type 'T'

Edit: Based on Yuriy and other's suggestions, I could do some casting such as:

    public void ValidateUsing<T>(Action<T> action) where T : IAnimal
    {
        Orangutan orangutan = new Orangutan();
        action((T)(IAnimal)orangutan);

        //This doesn't work either:
        IAnimal animal = new Orangutan();
        action((T)animal);
    }

The thing I wanted to do was call the ValidateUsing method like this:

ValidateUsing(Foo);

Unfortunately, if foo looks like this:

    private void Foo(Orangutan obj)
    {
        //Do something
    }

I have to explicitly specify the type when I call ValidateUsing

ValidateUsing<Orangutan>(Foo);
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Why are you instantiating an Orangutan if you are supposed to be accepting any IAnimal?

public void ValidateUsing<T>(Action<T> action) where T : IAnimal, new()
{
    T animal = new T();
    action(animal);  //Compile error 2

If you reuse your generic parameter, you won't have any type issues...

Now, with regard to why your code doesn't work, all that you're saying is that the type T will derive from IAnimal. However, it could just as easily be a Giraffe as an Orangutan, so you can't just assign an Orangutan or IAnimal to a parameter of type T.

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1  
+1 for explaining why instead of just rewriting the code. –  Greg Nov 24 '09 at 19:06
    
Thanks bdukes, I just used Orangutan as an example. Probably a bad one. I want to be able to call the action with any IAnimal. In the "real" code, the IAnimal is stored as a private field in the class. So, I'm not really instantiating anything. –  Matt Hornsby Nov 25 '09 at 4:59

The thing is, that T represents some type which by the way implements IAnimal.

So, when you try to compile action(new Organatum()) you getting an error because you have declared that the action should take a parameter of type T which in its turn could be of type, let's say, Fish - you can't cast Organatum to a Fish, can you?

If you want to trigger any action which takes parameter of a type which implements IAnimal interface, then simply forget about generics and use Action<IAnimal>.

HTH.

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Try this.

    Orangutan orangutan = new Orangutan();
    Action<IAnimal> castedAction = action as Action<IAnimal>;
    castedAction(orangutan);
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Thanks Stan! I'd upvote your answer if I had enough reputation. –  Matt Hornsby Nov 25 '09 at 21:27

Make the following changes:

Orangutan orangutan = new Orangutan();
action((T)(IAnimal)orangutan); 


IAnimal animal = new Orangutan();
action((T)animal);
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Hi Yuriy, this works very well. It's gets me part of the way (see edit). Thanks! –  Matt Hornsby Nov 25 '09 at 21:44
    public interface IAnimal { }
    public class Orangutan : IAnimal { }

    public void ValidateUsing<T>(Action<T> action) where T : IAnimal
    {
        Orangutan orangutan = new Orangutan();
        action((T)(orangutan as IAnimal));  // needs to be cast as IAnimal

        //This doesn't work either:
        IAnimal animal = new Orangutan();
        action((T)animal);  // needs to be cast as T
    }

It also seems like the fact that it's an interface makes a difference. If you had an abstract class Animal, instead of an interface, you could do this :

    public abstract class Animal { }
    public class Orangutan : Animal { }

    public void ValidateUsing<T>(Action<T> action) where T : Animal
    {
        Orangutan orangutan = new Orangutan();
        action(orangutan as T); 

        //This doesn't work either:
        Animal animal = new Orangutan();
        action(animal as T); 
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Hi climbage, thanks for the detailed answer. I tend to use interfaces much more often than abstract classes (favor composition vs. inheritance and all that), but it's interesting to know that it works with an abstract class. –  Matt Hornsby Nov 25 '09 at 21:28

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