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Code example:

In [171]: A = np.array([1.1, 1.1, 3.3, 3.3, 5.5, 6.6])

In [172]: B = np.array([111, 222, 222, 333, 333, 777])

In [173]: C = randint(10, 99, 6)

In [174]: df = pd.DataFrame(zip(A, B, C), columns=['A', 'B', 'C'])

In [175]: df.set_index(['A', 'B'], inplace=True)

In [176]: df
Out[176]: 
          C
A   B      
1.1 111  20
    222  31
3.3 222  24
    333  65
5.5 333  22
6.6 777  74 

Now, I want to retrieve A values:
Q1: in range [3.3, 6.6] - expected return value: [3.3, 5.5, 6.6] or [3.3, 3.3, 5.5, 6.6] in case last inclusive, and [3.3, 5.5] or [3.3, 3.3, 5.5] if not.
Q2: in range [2.0, 4.0] - expected return value: [3.3] or [3.3, 3.3]

Same for any other MultiIndex dimension, for example B values:
Q3: in range [111, 500] with repetitions, as number of data rows in range - expected return value: [111, 222, 222, 333, 333]

More formal:

Let us assume T is a table with columns A, B and C. The table includes n rows. Table cells are numbers, for example A double, B and C integers. Let's create a DataFrame of table T, let us name it DF. Let's set columns A and B indexes of DF (without duplication, i.e. no separate columns A and B as indexes, and separate as data), i.e. A and B in this case MultiIndex.

Questions:

  1. How to write a query on the index, for example, to query the index A (or B), say in the labels interval [120.0, 540.0]? Labels 120.0 and 540.0 exist. I must clarify that I am interested only in the list of indices as a response to the query!
  2. How to the same, but in case of the labels 120.0 and 540.0 do not exist, but there are labels by value lower than 120, higher than 120 and less than 540, or higher than 540?
  3. In case the answer for Q1 and Q2 was unique index values, now the same, but with repetitions, as number of data rows in index range.

I know the answers to the above questions in the case of columns which are not indexes, but in the indexes case, after a long research in the web and experimentation with the functionality of pandas, I did not succeed. The only method (without additional programming) I see now is to have a duplicate of A and B as data columns in addition to index.

Thanks in advance for help,
Slava

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you just show us your code for the dataframe? Your explanation is pretty difficult to understand... –  simon Jul 29 '13 at 10:06
1  
Code added @simon –  Vyacheslav Shkolyar Jul 29 '13 at 11:06
    
Thanks for making this question a lot clearer. Yet I have no idea how to achieve what you want to do... –  simon Jul 29 '13 at 11:13
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

To query the df by the MultiIndex values, for example where (A > 1.7) and (B < 666):

In [536]: result_df = df.loc[(df.index.get_level_values('A') > 1.7) & (df.index.get_level_values('B') < 666)]

In [537]: result_df
Out[537]: 
          C
A   B      
3.3 222  43
    333  59
5.5 333  56

Hence, to get for example the 'A' index values, if still required:

In [538]: result_df.index.get_level_values('A')
Out[538]: Index([3.3, 3.3, 5.5], dtype=object)

The problem is, that in large data frames the performance of by index selection worse by 10% than the sorted regular rows selection. And in repetitive work, looping, the delay accumulated. See example:

In [558]: df = store.select(STORE_EXTENT_BURSTS_DF_KEY)

In [559]: len(df)
Out[559]: 12857

In [560]: df.sort(inplace=True)

In [561]: df_without_index = df.reset_index()

In [562]: %timeit df.loc[(df.index.get_level_values('END_TIME') > 358200) & (df.index.get_level_values('START_TIME') < 361680)]
1000 loops, best of 3: 562 µs per loop

In [563]: %timeit df_without_index[(df_without_index.END_TIME > 358200) & (df_without_index.START_TIME < 361680)]
1000 loops, best of 3: 507 µs per loop
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With a 'float' like index you always want to use it as a column rather than a direct indexing action. These will all work whether the endpoints exist or not.

In [11]: df
Out[11]: 
          C
A   B      
1.1 111  81
    222  45
3.3 222  98
    333  13
5.5 333  89
6.6 777  98

In [12]: x = df.reset_index()

Q1

In [13]: x.loc[(x.A>=3.3)&(x.A<=6.6)]
Out[13]: 
     A    B   C
2  3.3  222  98
3  3.3  333  13
4  5.5  333  89
5  6.6  777  98

Q2

In [14]: x.loc[(x.A>=2.0)&(x.A<=4.0)]
Out[14]: 
     A    B   C
2  3.3  222  98
3  3.3  333  13

Q3

In [15]: x.loc[(x.B>=111.0)&(x.B<=500.0)]
Out[15]: 
     A    B   C
0  1.1  111  81
1  1.1  222  45
2  3.3  222  98
3  3.3  333  13
4  5.5  333  89

If you want the indices back, just set them. This is a cheap operation.

In [16]: x.loc[(x.B>=111.0)&(x.B<=500.0)].set_index(['A','B'])
Out[16]: 
          C
A   B      
1.1 111  81
    222  45
3.3 222  98
    333  13
5.5 333  89

If you REALLY want the actual index values

In [5]: x.loc[(x.B>=111.0)&(x.B<=500.0)].set_index(['A','B']).index
Out[5]: 
MultiIndex
[(1.1, 111), (1.1, 222), (3.3, 222), (3.3, 333), (5.5, 333)]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Jeff, but in such a case it is better to keep a duplicate initially of the above index columns as regular data columns. But the fact is that in my case, the initial full table is quite large and is stored in HDFStore, I process each time a different data frame received by means of a query. And to add two additional columns to the HDFStore with redundant data - wasting space. Dilemma ... –  Vyacheslav Shkolyar Jul 29 '13 at 14:30
    
actually if its in a store, then I just wouldn't store the index at all; store the columns you want to query as data_columns (which implicity index them), see: pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/dev/…, indexes (of the dataframe) are already stored as columns in the table, so you can directly query them –  Jeff Jul 29 '13 at 14:41
    
no so good performance. The use case is loop query HDFStore for sum sub-table; in each above iteration processing the sub-table in other loop. If I'll use in internal loop full indexed HDFStore queries instead of DataFrame the processing time will raise in more than 100 times for each sub-loop query (currently checked with IPython %timeit). –  Vyacheslav Shkolyar Jul 29 '13 at 15:19
    
why are you looping? pls show some code (you could do a sep question if you want), or post on mailing list, or here...up2u –  Jeff Jul 29 '13 at 15:23
    
I meant 'some' (not 'sum') subtable. –  Vyacheslav Shkolyar Jul 29 '13 at 15:29
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