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I am trying to populate a field in a table (or create a separate vector altogether, whichever is easier) with consecutive numbers from 1 to n, where n is the total number of records that share the same factor level, and then back to 1 for the next level, etc. That is, for a table like this

data<-matrix(c(rep('A',4),rep('B',3),rep('C',4),rep('D',2)),ncol=1)

the result should be a new column (e.g. "sample") as follows:

sample<-c(1,2,3,4,1,2,3,1,2,3,4,1,2)
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Welcome to Stack Overflow! You don't need to include signature in your post - your user card is added automatically. Read Help for more details. –  Artemix Jul 29 '13 at 12:19
2  
What's the expected result if the sequence of letter is for example: c(A,A,B,B,A) ? c(1,2,1,2,1) or c(1,2,1,2,3) ? –  digEmAll Jul 29 '13 at 12:57

5 Answers 5

You can get it as follows, using ave:

data <- data.frame(data)
new <- ave(rep(1,nrow(data)),data$data,FUN=cumsum)
all.equal(new,sample) # check if it's right.
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You can use rle function together with lapply :

sample <- unlist(lapply(rle(data[,1])$lengths,FUN=function(x){1:x}))

data <- cbind(data,sample)

Or even better, you can combine rle and sequence in the following one-liner (thanks to @Arun suggestion)

data <- cbind(data,sequence(rle(data[,1])$lengths))

> data
      [,1] [,2]
 [1,] "A"  "1" 
 [2,] "A"  "2" 
 [3,] "A"  "3" 
 [4,] "A"  "4" 
 [5,] "B"  "1" 
 [6,] "B"  "2" 
 [7,] "B"  "3" 
 [8,] "C"  "1" 
 [9,] "C"  "2" 
[10,] "C"  "3" 
[11,] "C"  "4" 
[12,] "D"  "1" 
[13,] "D"  "2" 
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Much better! I completely forgot sequence function, thanks :) –  digEmAll Jul 29 '13 at 12:51
1  
Sure, no problem. There's a bit of ambiguity in the question as to how he'd like to handle same levels that are not consecutive.. That is, if "C" were to occur again after "D", would he want to count it with the earlier "C" or not.. If not, then your solution is valid, if he'd like to count it together, then the other solutions are valid. –  Arun Jul 29 '13 at 12:52
1  
@Arun: that's a good point... I thought the OP wanted to count the consecutive sequence but now I'm not sure anymore... let's ask... –  digEmAll Jul 29 '13 at 12:55
    
Sorry about the ambiguity. If that should happen, those records should be counted together. However, I take care that that doesn't happen on an earlier step of my workflow. Almost all solutions suggested are suitable. I have so much to learn! –  user2630096 Jul 29 '13 at 13:10

There are lots of different ways of achieving this, but I prefer to use ddply() from plyr because the logic seems very consistent to me. I think it makes more sense to be working with a data.frame (your title talks about levels of a factor):

dat <- data.frame(ID = c(rep('A',4),rep('B',3),rep('C',4),rep('D',2)))
library(plyr)
ddply(dat, .(ID), summarise, sample = 1:length(ID))
#    ID sample
# 1   A      1
# 2   A      2
# 3   A      3
# 4   A      4
# 5   B      1
# 6   B      2
# 7   B      3
# 8   C      1
# 9   C      2
# 10  C      3
# 11  C      4
# 12  D      1
# 13  D      2
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My answer:

sample <- unlist(lapply(levels(factor(data)), function(x)seq_len(sum(factor(data)==x))))
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    factors <- unique(data)
    f1 <- length(which(data == factors[1]))
    ...
    fn <- length(which(data == factors[length(factors)]))

You can use a for loop or 'apply' family to speed that part up.

Then,

    sample <- c(1:f1, 1:f2, ..., 1:fn)

Once again you can use a for loop for that part. Here is the full script you can use:

    data<-matrix(c(rep('A',4),rep('B',3),rep('C',4),rep('D',2)),ncol=1)

    factors <- unique(data)
    f <- c()

    for(i in 1:length(factors)) {
      f[i] <- length(which(data == factors[i]))
    }

    sample <- c()

   for(i in 1:length(f)) {
      sample <- c(sample, 1:f[i])
    }

    > sample
     [1] 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2
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Here is an approach that I can follow all the way through. However, most of the other solutions worked too! –  user2630096 Jul 29 '13 at 13:13

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