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I'm simulating a 2d int array using an array of pointers to 1D arrays. The size is dynamic as the data is read from a file so I created a dynamic allocation function (alloc2DArrInt). It's been working well until I started testing my program with new data and now the first malloc sometimes crashes (segmentation fault?). Here's the relevant (I hope) parts of the code:

int** t_fv = NULL; // these are global
int** t_ofv = NULL;
int** b_fv = NULL;
int** b_ofv = NULL;

// assume these 2 lines are in main:

if (readFeatureVectors(&t_fv, &t_ofv, targetFilename, &trows, &tcolumns) < 0) { }
if (readFeatureVectors(&b_fv, &b_ofv, backgroundFilename, &brows, &bcolumns) < 0) { }

int readFeatureVectors(int*** fv, int*** ofv, char* fileName, int* rows, int* columns) {
    // hidden code
    alloc2DArrInt(fv, *rows, *columns); //&*fv
    alloc2DArrInt(ofv, *rows, *columns);
    // hidden code
}

void inline alloc2DArrInt(int*** array, int rows, int columns) {
    int i;
    *array = malloc(rows * sizeof(int*)); // sometimes crashes
    if (*array != NULL ) {
        for (i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
            (*array)[i] = malloc(columns * sizeof(int));
            if ((*array)[i] == NULL ) {
                printf("Error: alloc2DArrInt - %d columns for row %d\n", columns, i);
                exit(1);
            }
        }
    } else {
        printf("Error: alloc2DArrInt - rows\n");
        exit(1);
    }
}

The allocations for t_fv, t_ofv, and b_fv work but the program crashes at the first malloc for b_ofv. When I switch the order of the readFeatureVectors calls, the program crashes at the first malloc for t_fv (not t_ofv).

I also developed realloc and dealloc versions of the function but they are not in play at this point in the code.

I know I should start using a debugger or memory checking tool, but I've had trouble getting that to work with Eclipse Juno. I might migrate over to Ubuntu and try to use valgrind but I'm hoping to avoid it for now if possible.

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1  
Have you checked the value of rows and columns to make sure they're reasonable? –  Drew McGowen Jul 29 '13 at 13:18
    
@DrewMcGowen: yes they match up with the files I'm reading. –  Ahmad Jul 29 '13 at 13:31
    
Sounds like this would happen because 'rows' has some odd value. Can you verify the value is sound before the malloc? I'm also assuming that t_rows, b_rows, etc. are all also global. I'm thinking some array above them is being overwritten and clobbering them. (pretty speculative...I know). –  Jim Jul 29 '13 at 13:36
    
Why do you need ** for t_fv? Seems like overkill for what you are doing. –  Jim Jul 29 '13 at 13:40

2 Answers 2

The only reasons the line with malloc would crash are if the heap data structure was damaged, or if the array pointer was invalid. Most likely outcome would be a SIGSEGV.

Otherwise malloc wouldn't crash regardless of whatever argument you pass to it. It will return NULL at worst.

The heap data structure can be damaged for example due to buffer overflow/underflow. Use valgrind to detect that or the invalid array pointer conditions.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking a look. I'll switch to Ubuntu and try valgrind. –  Ahmad Jul 29 '13 at 14:19

I don't think there is anything in your code that you showed here that should be making it crash. I put your program into eclipse and ran debug mode on it and it runs fine. I used the following code:

#define NULL 0

int** t_fv = NULL; // these are global
int** t_ofv = NULL;
int** b_fv = NULL;
int** b_ofv = NULL;

int main()
{
    int trows = 3000;
    int tcolumns = 3000;

    int brows = 5000;
    int bcolumns = 5000;

    char targetFilename[64] = "target";
    char backgroundFilename[64] = "background";

    if (readFeatureVectors(&t_fv, &t_ofv, targetFilename, &trows, &tcolumns) == 1)
    {printf("Worked1\n"); }

    if (readFeatureVectors(&b_fv, &b_ofv, backgroundFilename, &brows, &bcolumns) == 1)
    { printf("Worked2\n"); }

    printf("We are done now\n");

}

int readFeatureVectors(int*** fv, int*** ofv, char* fileName, int* rows, int* columns) {
    // hidden code
    alloc2DArrInt(fv, *rows, *columns); //&*fv
    alloc2DArrInt(ofv, *rows, *columns);
    // hidden code

    return 1;
}

void inline alloc2DArrInt(int*** array, int rows, int columns) {
    int i;
    *array = malloc(rows * sizeof(int*)); // sometimes crashes
    if (*array != NULL ) {
        for (i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
            (*array)[i] = malloc(columns * sizeof(int));
            if ((*array)[i] == NULL ) {
                printf("Error: alloc2DArrInt - %d columns for row %d\n", columns, i);
                exit(1);
            }
        }
    } else {
        printf("Error: alloc2DArrInt - rows\n");
        exit(1);
    }
}

Stepping through step by step, it all seems to work just fine. I tried smaller arrays first of 3x3 and 5x5 and they worked as well. I then tried 10 times the size and I still didn't run out of memory.

My first guess would be that your sizes of the rows and columns you are requesting are too large and you are running out of memory. You could put a busy wait in your code somewhere and do a memory check to see how much your program is taking (free in linux, taskmgr in windows). Also, you could printf rows and columns to make sure you aren't requesting something of an unreasonable size.

I would think it may be possible that you are having problems with your //hidden code as well.

You would be well served to get Eclipse or something similar up and running. I think you will find your problem very quickly with a debug tool like that as you will be able to find the exact line you are crashing on and figure out the state of your memory at that time.

share|improve this answer
    
The requested rows and columns are too small for it to be an out of memory issue. As you said, it's likely related to other parts of my code. I've never done much debugging in c but I guess it's time to start. Many thanks Brian for taking a look. At least you've confirmed that my allocation function is correct. –  Ahmad Jul 29 '13 at 14:15

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