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Let say I have 2 lists

public List<TypeA> TypeARecords {get; set;}
public List<TypeB> TypeBRecords {get; set;}

Both TypeA and TypeB implements same Interface (let say IBaseRecord)

Now I have a read only property that returns list of all records

public List<IBaseRecord> AllRecords
{
    get 
    {
        var allRecs = new List<IBaseRecord>();

        foreach ( var rec in TypeARecords)
            allRecs.Add(rec);

        foreach ( var rec in TypeBRecords)
            allRecs.Add(rec);

        return allRecs;
    }
}

This works but I am sure there is more effective or just smarter way to do same thing Any ideas?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can make an iterator that returns the items in the list:

public IEnumerable<IBaseRecord> GetAllRecords {
  foreach (var rec in TypeARecords) {
    yield return rec;
  }
  foreach (var rec in TypeBRecords) {
    yield return rec;
  }
}

This way you don't have to create a new list with all the items, it will just read from the existing lists.

Edit:
As Stan R. suggested, you can use the ToList method to create a copy of the list:

List<IBaseRecord> work = obj.GetAllRecords().ToList();

This is a bit better than having a property that returns a new list, as the ownership of the list gets clearer. Also, a property should not do such heavy lifting as creating lists, at least not every time the property is read.

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I like the idea but in my case I need the actual copy to modify it –  Michael D. Nov 24 '09 at 20:18
    
@Michael D., you can use this code with .ToList() to create a copy to a list GetAllRecords.ToList() –  Stan R. Nov 24 '09 at 20:23
    
@Guffa, +1 thanks for this piece of code. I constantly forget the "yield" keyword, i think this is a great reminder of thinking outside the box. thanks. –  Stan R. Nov 24 '09 at 20:24
    
You are absolutely right! –  Michael D. Nov 24 '09 at 20:30
    
@Stan: Good suggestion about using ToList to create a copy. This is better than having a property that returns a list, as the ownership of the list is clear. Also, semantically a property should not do such heavy lifting as creating lists (at least not every time it's read). –  Guffa Nov 24 '09 at 23:00

Your way.

public List<IBaseRecord> AllRecords
{
    get 
    {
        return new List<IBaseRecord>().
            Concat(TypeARecords.OfType<IBaseRecord>()).
            Concat(TypeBRecords.OfType<IBaseRecord>()).
            ToList();
    }
}

Better way.

public IEnumerable<IBaseRecord> AllRecords
{
    get 
    {
        foreach (var i in TypeARecords) yield return i;
        foreach (var i in TypeBRecords) yield return i;
    }
}

Best way IMHO.

public IEnumerable<IBaseRecord> AllRecords
{
    get 
    {
        return TypeARecords.Concat<IBaseRecord>(TypeBRecords);
    }
}
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I like your BEST way if only you have only 2 types of records (Like I posted in the sample). But in real life I have more than two types: so I decided to go with: allRecs.AddRange(TypeARecords.Cast<IBaseRecord>()); allRecs.AddRange(TypeBRecords.Cast<IBaseRecord>()); ..... allRecs.AddRange(TypeNRecords.Cast<IBaseRecord>()); –  Michael D. Nov 24 '09 at 20:16
    
My best way and the way you like are actually same, but your way creates one more collection which is probably redundant. :) My way is extedible as well: return TypeARecords.Concat<IBaseRecord>(TypeBRecords).Concat<IBaseRecord>(TypeNRecords)‌​; –  Vasiliy Borovyak Nov 24 '09 at 20:24

Unless you use the common interface to declare your 2 lists, you can't do this until C# 4 without something similar to what you mentioned (or the linq equivalent).

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I do have a common interface - IBaseRecord in this sample. –  Michael D. Nov 24 '09 at 19:55
    
Right, but he means you have to declare the lists with that interface: e.g. List<IBaseRecord> TypeARecords, etc. –  J Cooper Nov 24 '09 at 19:59
    
Ok I see, but I cannot change the public interface of my class. –  Michael D. Nov 24 '09 at 20:08

You can use List.AddRange(), but that's still an O(n) operation, implying that it iterates over all of the members being added, so it's just essentially syntatic sugar for what you're already doing.

Presumably you don't want to modify either ListA or ListB, so you will have to iterate in order to create the new pointers for your new list.

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What Blindy means is unless you do

public List<IBaseRecord> TypeARecords {get; set;}
public List<IBaseRecord> TypeBRecords {get; set;}

Then you can do something like

public IEnumerable<IBaseRecord> AllRecords
{
    get 
    {
        return Enumerable.Concat(TypeARecords, TypeBRecords);
    }
}
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public List<IBaseRecord> AllRecords
{
    get
    {
        return TypeARecords.Cast<IBaseRecord>()
            .Concat(TypeBRecords.Cast<IBaseRecord>()).ToList();
    }
}
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