Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a pandas data frame and group it by two columns (for example col1 and col2). For fixed values of col1 and col2 (i.e. for a group) I can have several different values in the col3. I would like to count the number of distinct values from the third columns.

For example, If I have this as my input:

1  1  1
1  1  1
1  1  2
1  2  3
1  2  3
1  2  3
2  1  1
2  1  2
2  1  3
2  2  3
2  2  3
2  2  3

I would like to have this table (data frame) as the output:

1  1  2
1  2  1
2  1  3
2  2  1
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

df.groupby(['col1','col2'])['col3'].nunique().reset_index()
share|improve this answer
    
interestingly nunique seems twice as slow as Jeff's answer. –  Andy Hayden Jul 29 '13 at 14:31
    
Weird! I am seeing that also. Groupby may be taking the wrong so-called path here -- the logic that applies functions to groups is pretty dense. –  Dan Allan Jul 29 '13 at 15:52
1  
there is more overhead with calling value_count (which has to reconstruct the series) on each group (rather than unique which just return an ndarray). This can actually be non-trivial. If you don't need the indexes inside the function then you can often avoid this penalty (by not instantiating the series, which value_counts does, and then gets discarded because all you need is the len of it) –  Jeff Jul 29 '13 at 16:41
In [17]: df
Out[17]: 
    0  1  2
0   1  1  1
1   1  1  1
2   1  1  2
3   1  2  3
4   1  2  3
5   1  2  3
6   2  1  1
7   2  1  2
8   2  1  3
9   2  2  3
10  2  2  3
11  2  2  3

In [19]: df.groupby([0,1])[2].apply(lambda x: len(x.unique()))
Out[19]: 
0  1
1  1    2
   2    1
2  1    3
   2    1
dtype: int64
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.