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In C++, map class is very comfortable. Instead of going for a separate database I want to store all the rows as objects and I want to create map object for the columns to search. I am concerned with maximum objects a process can handle. And is using map function to retrieve an object among, say, 10 million objects, if linux permits, is a good choice? I'm not worried about persisting the data.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, there is no maximum number of objects per process. Objects (as in, C++ objects) are an abstraction which the OS is unaware of. The only meaningful limit in this regard is the amount of memory used.

You can completely fill your RAM using as much map as it takes, I promise.

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thank you for ur promise. –  neckTwi Jul 30 '13 at 5:00

What you are looking for is std::map::max_size, quoting from the reference:

...reflects the theoretical limit on the size of the container. At runtime, the size of the container may be limited to a value smaller than max_size() by the amount of RAM available.

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As you can see in reference documentation, the constannt map::max_size will let you know the numbers.

This should be 2^31-1 on iX86 hardware/OS and 2^64-1 on amd64 hardware/64bit OS

Possible additionnal information here.

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Object is a concept in programming language. In fact, the processes are not aware of the objects. With enough RAM space, you can alloc as many objects as possible in your program. About your second question, my answer is that which data structure you choose in your program depends on the problem that you want to solve in your program. Map is a suitable data structure for quick accessing objects, testing existance, etc, but is not good enough to maintain the objects' order.

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