Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given a m x n grid, how many unique sub-rectangles exist on such a grid?

For example,

1 x 1 grid has 1 sub-rectangle.

1 x 2 grid has 3 sub-rectangles.

I am looking for a general formula that can be used to directly compute the number existing sub-rectangle.

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
How many triangles of size a x b are there on an m x n grid? Now sum that up for all a and b. –  Chris Taylor Jul 29 '13 at 15:12
    
I am looking for a single formula. –  q0987 Jul 29 '13 at 15:12
2  
And I am trying to help you find it. –  Chris Taylor Jul 29 '13 at 15:13
1  
@q0987 Right! So you get the answer by summing that over all i=1...m and j=1...n. It will help to expand the brackets some. Do you know the formula for the sum of whole numbers between 1 and N? –  Chris Taylor Jul 29 '13 at 15:21
1  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about mathematics. –  David Eisenstat Jul 30 '13 at 17:03
show 5 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The answer is m(m+1)n(n+1)/4.

a rectangle is defined by its two projections on the x-axis and on the y-axis.

projection on x-axis : number of pairs (a,b) such that 1 <= a <= b <= m = m(m+1)/2

idem for y-axis

share|improve this answer
add comment

Same answer as @Thomash provided, but with a bit more explanation, posting for posterity:

If you can figure this out in one dimension, it's easy to move it into two dimensions.

Let's look at a 1x5:

 5 1x1 squares
+4 1x2 squares
+3 1x3 squares
+2 1x4 squares
+1 1x5 squares = 15 squares.

The formula for this is simple: sum = n(1 + max)/ 2. In the case of 5, you want 5(1+5)/2 = 15.

So, to get your answer, just do this for n and m, and multiply them:

sumN = n(1+n)/2
sumM = m(1+m)/2
totalRectangles = nm(1+n)(1+m)/4
share|improve this answer
add comment

For this lets assume you've m columns and n rows:

. . . .
. . . .
. . . .

In above grid, m is 4 and n is 3. Let say you need to know how many rectangle you can form if you select top-left point. If you select top left-corner i.e.

* . . .
. . . .
. . . .

You have have 3 point to choose in right and 2 points to choose at bottom, therefore total combinations are: 3*2 = 6.

Therefore total number rectangle you can form will correspond to total number of rectangles at each point starting from (0, 0) (top left assume to be 0, 0) till (m-1, n-1).

If you try to find summation of this:

[(m-1)*(n-1) + (m-2)*(n-1) + (m-3)*(n-1) ... + (n-1)] + 
[(m-1)*(n-2) + (m-2)*(n-2) ... + 1*(n-2)] +
[(m-1)*(n-3) + (m-2)*(n-3) ... + 1*(n-3)] +
... 

Which is equal to

(n-1)*(1 + 2 + .. + m-1)
+
(n-2)*(1 + 2 + .. + m-1)
+
.
.
+
1*(1 + 2 + ... + m-1)

So you get

(1 + 2 + ... + n-1) * ( 1 + 2 + 3 ... + m-1)
= mn(n-1)(m-1)/4

Since m and n is your case are not number of point but number of line segments formed. Above formula can be transformed:

m = m + 1
&
n = n + 1

And it becomes

(n+1)(m+1)mn / 4
share|improve this answer
    
let's take n=1 and m=2, then [(m-1)*(n-1)(m+n)]/2=0 !!! Don't you think there is something wrong? –  Thomash Jul 29 '13 at 15:37
    
@Thomash If I understand it right, n=1 means it single line so you should be making 0 rectangles. –  User 104 Jul 29 '13 at 15:39
    
You should read the question again: 1 x 2 grid has 3 sub-rectangles. –  Thomash Jul 29 '13 at 15:41
    
@Thomash Thanks! I've corrected my solution. –  User 104 Jul 29 '13 at 15:56
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.