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I have a questions about recommended coding technique. I have a tool for model analysis and I sometimes need to pass a big amount of data (From a factory class to one that holds multiple heterogeneous chunks).

My question is whether there is some consensus about if I should rather use pointers or move the ownership (I need to avoid copying when possible as the size of a data-block may be as big as 1 GB).

The pointer version would look like this:

class FactoryClass {
...
public:
   static Data * createData() {
      Data * data = new Data;
      ...
      return data;
   }
};

class StorageClass {
   unique_ptr<Data> data_ptr;
...
public:
   void setData(Data * _data_ptr) {
      data_ptr.reset(_data_ptr);
   }
};

void pass() {
   Data * data = FactoryClass::createData();
   ...
   StorageClass storage;
   storage.setData(data);
}

Whereas the move version is like this:

class FactoryClass {
...
public:
   static Data createData() {
      Data data;
      ...
      return data;
   }
};

class StorageClass {
   Data data;
...
public:
   void setData(Data _data) {
      data = move(_data);
   }
};

void pass() {
   Data data = FactoryClass::createData();
   ...
   StorageClass storage;
   storage.setData(move(data));
}

I like the move version better - yes, I need to add move commands to the main code, but then I in the end have just the objects in the storage and I do not have to care about pointer semantics anymore.

However I am not quite relaxed when using the move semantics whom I do not understand in detail. (I do not care about the C++11 requirement though, as the code is already only Gcc4.7+ compilable).

Would someone have a reference that would support either version? Or is there some other, preferred version of how to pass data?

I was not able to Google anything as the keywords usually led to other topics.

Thanks.

EDIT NOTE: The second example got refactored to incorporate suggestions from the comments, the semantics remained unchanged.

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1  
The biggest reason to use move semantics is not to avoid pointer semantics: it is because you eliminate the need for new/deletes, everything is scope controlled, following RAII, and you no longer need to worry (as much) about memory leaks. –  IdeaHat Jul 29 '13 at 16:05
1  
@MadScienceDreams I agree "...is not to avoid pointer..." but I can't understand "...you eliminate the need for new/deletes...". Does it? I thought it's to avoid expansive/useless copies (done moving ownership of, let's say, big chunk of memory from one object to another). –  Adriano Repetti Jul 29 '13 at 16:12
3  
In the first interface, why are you passing raw pointers around rather than smart pointers? In the second version, why does setData take an rvalue-reference and not a value? --Both changes would improve each one of the api's –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 29 '13 at 16:38
2  
@PunyOne, it will only call the copy constructor if passed an lvalue, if passed an rvalue (e.g. a temporary or an rvalue reference as returned by std::move) it will call a move constructor. Keep reading about move semantics. Start with Want speed? Pass by value –  Jonathan Wakely Jul 29 '13 at 17:43
2  
To go on with the previous comment from Jonathan: by taking an rvalue-reference you force the move in the interface (rather than copy), which means that if the user wants to keep their own object they will need to copy and then move the copy. By having the argument be by value you allow the user to copy or move from an lvalue, and the compiler will always move (or elide the copy) from a temporary –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 29 '13 at 17:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When you are passing an object to a function, what you pass depends in part on how that function is going to use it. A function can use an object in one of three general ways:

  1. It can simply reference the object for the duration of the function call, with the calling function (or it's eventual parent up the call stack) maintaining ownership of the object. The reference in this case may be a constant reference or a modifiable reference. The function will not store this object long-term.

  2. It can copy the object directly. It doesn't gain ownership of the original, but it does acquire a copy of the original, so as to store, modify, or do with the copy what it will. Note that the difference between #1 and this is that the copy is made explicit in the parameter list. For example, taking a std::string by value. But this could also be as simple as taking an int by value.

  3. It can gain some form of ownership of the object. The function then has some responsibility over the object's destruction. This also allows the function to store the object long-term.

My general recommendation for the parameter types for these paradigms are as follows:

  1. Take the object by an explicit language reference where possible. If that's not possible, try a std::reference_wrapper. If that can't work, and no other solutions seem reasonable, then use a pointer. A pointer would be for things like optional parameters (though C++14's std::optional will make that less useful. Pointers will still have uses though), language arrays (though again, we have objects that cover most of the uses of these), and so forth.

  2. Take the object by value. That one's pretty non-negotiable.

  3. Take the object either by value-move (ie: move it into a by-value parameter) or by a smart-pointer to the object (which will also be taken by value, since you're going to copy/move it anyway). The problem with your code is that you're transferring ownership via a pointer, but with a raw pointer. Raw pointers have no ownership semantics. The moment you allocate any pointer, you should immediately wrap it in some kind of smart pointer. So your factory function should have returned a unique_ptr.

Your case appears to be #3. Which you use between value-move and smart pointer is entirely up to you. If you have to heap allocate Data for some reason, then the choice is pretty much made for you. If Data can be stack allocated, then you have some options.

I would generally do this based on an estimation of Data's internal size. If internally, it's just a few pointers/integers (and by "few", I mean like 3-4), then putting it on the stack is fine.

Indeed, it can better because you'll have less chance of a double-cache-miss. If your Data functions often just access data from another pointer, if you store Data by pointer, then every function call on it will have to dereference your stored pointer to fetch the internal one, then dereference the internal one. That's two potential cache misses, since neither pointer has any locality with StorageClass.

If you store Data by value, it's much more likely that Data's internal pointer will already be in the cache. It has better locality with StorageClass's other members; if you accessed some of StorageClass before now, you already paid for a cache miss, so you are likely to already have Data in the cache.

But movement is not free. It's cheaper than a full copy, but it's not free. You're still copying the internal data (and possibly nulling out any pointers on the original). But then again, allocating memory on the heap isn't free either. Nor is deallocating it.

But then again, if you're not moving it around very often (you move it around to get it to its final location, but little more after that), even moving a larger object would be fine. If you're using it more than you're moving it, then the cache locality of the object's storage will probably win out over the cost of moving.

There ultimately aren't a lot of technical reasons to pick one or the other. I would say to default to movement where reasonable.

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I have just realized quite a obvious fact that with the move variant I am inevitably calling twice the constructor for Data as the object within the storage must be initialized with the construction of the storage object. It's not a problem directly in my code as I create the storage only once, but considering the Data object contains some objects / statically allocated arrays, would that be a good argument for the pointer version? –  PunyOne Jul 30 '13 at 9:29

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