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Im trying to create an override for cl_float4.

Definition:

cl_float4 operator- (const cl_float4 &V1, const cl_float4 &V2);

Implementation:

cl_float4 operator- (cl_float4 &V1, cl_float4 &V2){
    return {V1.x - V2.x, V1.y - V2.y, V1.z - V2.z, V1.w - V2.w};
}

Now when I do something like:

cl_float4 a = {1,2,3,4}, b = {4,3,2,1};

cl_float4 c = a - b;

it all works fine, but:

cl_float4 a = {1,2,3,4}, b = {4,3,2,1};

cl_float4 c = a - b - b;

Gives an error: "Invalid operands to binary expression (cl_float4 and cl_float4)"

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Don't you have something like x, y, z, w are not members of cl_float4? –  CaptainObvious Jul 29 '13 at 17:55
    
I've just copy paste your code and I have this error. When I replace x, y, z, w with s[0], s[1], etx, it works fine...for both situation. –  CaptainObvious Jul 29 '13 at 18:01
    
Changed x,y,z,w with s[0]-s[3]. Still the same thing. –  user1513100 Jul 29 '13 at 21:53
    
I don't know why, but I think when you do "a - b - b" it is not exactly like 2 normal operations. I think the definition of the operator is different. –  DarkZeros Jul 30 '13 at 14:31

1 Answer 1

You need to change the definition from:

cl_float4 operator- (cl_float4 &V1, cl_float4 &V2){

to

cl_float4 operator- (**const** cl_float4 &V1, **const** cl_float4 &V2){

The reason is that the return value of the first operation (intermediate/temporary cl_float4) is not implicitly convertible to cl_float4 &, but it will be implicitly convertible to const cl_float4 &.

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