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I'm completely new to asking questions on stackoverflow and more or less a novice at R (and programming in general) so bear with me.

I have ASCII files of species ranges which only show presence only. After scouring the far reaches of the internet, I've managed to upload, convert to raster, mask along desired borders (in my case, the coastline of Australia), and plot them so I can visualize the ranges on an unprojected map.

Having accomplished the qualitative aspect of this, I need to get to the quantitative aspect; that is, I need to calculate the degree of sympatry between species. In order to do that, I need to first calculate the area of overlap, which is where I run into problems. Here's what I've managed to do so far:

> d
class       : RasterLayer 
dimensions  : 85, 270, 22950  (nrow, ncol, ncell)
resolution  : 0.08, 0.08  (x, y)
extent      : 119.4993, 141.0993, -36.65831, -29.85831  (xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax)
coord. ref. : +proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 +ellps=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0 
data source : in memory
names       : layer 
values      : 2, 2  (min, max)

> b
class       : RasterLayer 
dimensions  : 140, 222, 31080  (nrow, ncol, ncell)
resolution  : 0.08, 0.08  (x, y)
extent      : 134.2456, 152.0056, -40.44268, -29.24268  (xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax)
coord. ref. : +proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 +ellps=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0 
data source : in memory
names       : layer 
values      : 2, 2  (min, max)

x<-resample(b,d,method="ngb")
y<-mask(x,d)

>y
class       : RasterLayer 
dimensions  : 85, 270, 22950  (nrow, ncol, ncell)
resolution  : 0.08, 0.08  (x, y)
extent      : 119.4993, 141.0993, -36.65831, -29.85831  (xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax)
coord. ref. : +proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 +ellps=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0 
data source : in memory
names       : layer 
values      : 2, 2  (min, max)

y is a raster of the overlap between d and b masked over d (when I try to mask over b I get error saying that the extents are different). How do I calculate the area of it? the area() function from the raster package spits this out:

area(y)
class       : RasterLayer 
dimensions  : 85, 270, 22950  (nrow, ncol, ncell)
resolution  : 0.08, 0.08  (x, y)
extent      : 119.4993, 141.0993, -36.65831, -29.85831  (xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax)
coord. ref. : +proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 +ellps=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0 
data source : in memory
names       : layer 
values      : 63.65553, 68.75387  (min, max)

I'm not entirely sure what to do with this. Is this even a good/accurate/correct way of getting areas? Why are the extents different between y and b but the same between d and y? Furthermore, what are the units of the values from area(y)? I suppose the units don't matter too much because I will be taking a ratio eventually (by dividing the overlap by the range of the more restricted species), but I am curious to know for future reference.

I'm sorry if this is a stupid question. I appreciate any input someone might have.

share|improve this question
    
I may be misunderstanding the exact question, so take my comment with a grain of salt. Could you provide a sample of the ASCII format with your presence data? I suspect we could calculate the overlap between areas more directly from the locational data. Also, if possible, please post a sample of the plot you are creating. A picture speaks a thousand words... –  Dinre Jul 29 '13 at 18:22
    
Okay, apparently I missed the a bit on the description for area() where it tells you that the units are km^2. –  gen Jul 29 '13 at 18:25
    
@Dinre -apparently I don't have the reputation to add images to my question. Here is a link <a href="imgur.com/tHL99j6"><img src="i.imgur.com/tHL99j6.png"; title="Hosted by imgur.com" /></a>. R fritzed out on me before I had the wherewithal to add Australia to the image. As for the ASCII format, I don't know how to describe it; it's a series of 2s and -3.4e+38 arranged in a pattern where -3.4e+38 represents NODATA_VALUE and 2 I assume represents presence of the species. –  gen Jul 29 '13 at 18:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The best way to get the overlap is with intersect. You can create a brick of the overlapping values and use a command like any to get the overlapping ranges, assuming the value is 1 or TRUE in each range and 0, FALSE, or NA outside the range:

library(raster)

wgs84 <- "+proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 +ellps=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0"
d <- raster()
extent(d) <- extent(119.4993, 141.0993, -36.65831, -29.85831)
res(d) <- c(0.08, 0.08)
projection(d) <- CRS(wgs84)
values(d) <- sample(c(NA, 1), ncell(d), replace=TRUE)

b <- raster()
extent(b) <- c(134.2456, 152.0056, -40.44268, -29.24268 )
res(b) <- c(0.08, 0.08)
projection(b) <- CRS(wgs84)
values(b) <- sample(c(NA, 1), ncell(b), replace=TRUE)

y <- intersect(b, d)

x <- brick(resample(b, y, method = "ngb"),resample(d, y, method = "ngb"))
x2 <- any(x, na.rm = TRUE)

library(maps)
map(regions = "australia")
image(d, add = TRUE, col = "blue")
image(b, add = TRUE, col = "green")
plot(extent(y), add = TRUE)
image(x2, add = TRUE, col = "red")

enter image description here

The area function gets you the approximate area of each cell (in order to get the true area, you should reproject it to an area coordinate system). To get the total approximate area of the overlap, add all the cell values, index the area summation by the values of the combined raster:

sum(values(area(x2))[which(values(x2))])
# [1] 361407.1
share|improve this answer
    
This is way more intuitive than what I did, but it creates a general region of overlap; whereas one of the species I'm working with has breaks in its range. I need it to look like this: [IMG]i.imgur.com/tHL99j6.png[/IMG] Also, if I were to reproject the rasters, would I do what you did with CRS() and just specify a different projection? Would I be able to use that to calculate the area or would it still be an approximation? –  gen Jul 29 '13 at 19:55
    
To reproject you need a transformation function like projectRaster, the first CRS application simply tells R what is the "from" coordinate system, it could be anything and it's required to specify how to get to the "to" coordinate system. I am sure that area()'s approximation will be fine in this case, reprojection of a raster adds a lot more problems. You can mask out pixels with a polygon data set, and sum pixel area based on a test with that to get the land-only parts. –  mdsumner Jul 29 '13 at 20:41
    
I see what you're looking for now, you want the area of the combined ranges. I've changed the code above to answer your question. In general, though, rasters probably aren't the best tool to answer this question. I would use a vector format (SpatialPolygons in the sp package is an excellent implementation). As to area: The area function is only for unprojected data. If you project it to an areal projection (yes, using CRS with a proj4 spec), the area is simply the resolution of the cells, times the number of positive cells. –  Noah Jul 29 '13 at 20:47
    
@Noah -That's exactly what I needed! Thanks! I'll try playing around with SpatialPolygons as well. Why is vector better than raster, just out of curiosity's (and for precision's) sake? –  gen Jul 29 '13 at 21:55
1  
@gen Vector shapes are, by definition, a specification of an enclosed area, which is what you were trying to describe. Also, using vectors gives you access to vector maths, which include very easy union (overlap) equations. –  Dinre Jul 30 '13 at 15:23

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