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If I use syntax like this

SELECT * FROM table_1, table_2 WHERE table_1.id=table_2.id;

is this an INNER JOIN? In other words, is this equivalent to

SELECT * FROM table_1 INNER JOIN table_2 ON table_1.id=table_2.id;
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marked as duplicate by bluefeet, Lamak, swasheck, Cade Roux, Matt Fenwick Jul 29 '13 at 17:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
yes, it is equivalent. –  bluefeet Jul 29 '13 at 17:36
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see this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1018822/… –  Zak Jul 29 '13 at 17:37
    
Thanks Zak. I worried that this was a duplicate but couldn't condense my question down to a search that answered my question. –  Bill Jul 29 '13 at 18:05
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Short answer: Yes, it is the same.

Most RDBMS will eventually process both syntax the same way.

Using the INNER JOIN is considered to be better readable, and also is the ANSI standard.

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The other syntax is ANSI standard as well ;) –  ypercube Jul 29 '13 at 18:18
    
I know, I just didn't put it in there to avoid a religious debate about it! :-) –  Bjoern Jul 29 '13 at 18:26
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For simple cases like this, it appears that the MySQL engine will optimize in the same way. I figured this out by running

DESCRIBE SELECT * FROM table_1, table_2 WHERE table_1.id=table_2.id;

and

DESCRIBE SELECT * FROM table_1 INNER JOIN table_2 ON table_1.id=table_2.id;

which tells you a bit about how the query will run.

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