Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am a new programmer using Python 2.75

I have a nested dictionary called by_sale in this format:

{sale : {days_elapsed: daily_sales_amount}}.

For example:

{'Spring Savings 0413' : {1 : 3000, 2: 2000, 4:1000}, 
 'Back to School 0812' : {1: 4000, 3:3000, 4:2000}}

Note that 'Spring Savings 0413' has no Day 3, and 'Back to School 0812' has no Day 2.

I an trying to create a new dictionary called by_day that will store each day and the running total for each sale, even for days with no new sales, like this:

{1: {'Spring Savings 0413': 3000, 'Back to School 0812': 4000}, 
 2: {'Spring Savings 0413': 5000, 'Back to School 0812': 4000}, 
 3: {'Spring Savings 0413': 5000, 'Back to School 0812': 7000}, 
 4: {'Spring Savings 0413': 6000, 'Back to School 0812': 9000}}

Here is my code:

by_day = {}
for sale in by_sale.iterkeys():
    running_total = 0
    for i in range(1,4): #check for each day in the first 4 days
        by_day[i] = {} #initialize a nested blank dictionary for each day
        daily_amount = by_sale[sale].get(i,0) #grab the amount for the day, if none, return a zero
        running_total += daily_amount
        by_day[i][sale] = running # --> I know this is my problem... but why?
print by_day

What I get back is only the values for the last sale, which appears to be overwriting the other sales data:

{1: {'Back to School 0812': 4000}, 
 2: {'Back to School 0812': 4000}, 
 3: {'Back to School 0812': 7000}, 
 4: {'Back to School 0812': 9000}}

I kind of get what is happening here... I just can't figure out how to stop it from happening. Any pointers would be greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are overwriting the entry for each key on every loop using by_day[i] = {}. You should rather check for existence of key, in which case, you should update the existing dict.

Or alternatively, use a collections.defaultdict:

>>> by_sale = {'Spring Savings 0413' : {1 : 3000, 2: 2000, 4:1000}, 'Back to School 0812' : {1: 4000, 3:3000, 4:2000}}
>>> 
>>> 
>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> 
>>> by_day = defaultdict(dict)
>>> for sale, sale_info in by_sale.iteritems():
...     running_total = 0
...     for i in range(1,5):
...         daily_amount = sale_info.get(i,0)
...         running_total += daily_amount
...         by_day[i].update({sale:running_total})
... 
>>> 
>>> dict(by_day)
{1: {'Spring Savings 0413': 3000, 'Back to School 0812': 4000}, 
 2: {'Spring Savings 0413': 5000, 'Back to School 0812': 4000}, 
 3: {'Spring Savings 0413': 5000, 'Back to School 0812': 7000}, 
 4: {'Spring Savings 0413': 6000, 'Back to School 0812': 9000}}

You should use range(1, 5) instead. range(1, 4) gives - [1, 2, 3].

share|improve this answer
    
You can do for sale, sale_info in by_sale.iteritems(): and then avoid the other by_sale[sale] lookup; you also don't need the running total because you can simply fetch the current amount in the dict. – Burhan Khalid Jul 29 '13 at 19:16
    
@BurhanKhalid. Yeah right. Will edit it. Thanks :) – Rohit Jain Jul 29 '13 at 19:17
    
@BurhanKhalid. For 2nd case, I think I have to do the test, or use a nested defaultdict. Which would be better? – Rohit Jain Jul 29 '13 at 19:21
    
iteritems() not iterkeys() – Burhan Khalid Jul 29 '13 at 19:31
    
@BurhanKhalid. OOPs. Fixed thanks :) – Rohit Jain Jul 29 '13 at 19:32

here's solution without defaultdict:

d = {'Spring Savings 0413' : {1 : 3000, 2: 2000, 4:1000}, 
 'Back to School 0812' : {1: 4000, 3:3000, 4:2000}}

r = {}

for s, l in d.items():
    for i in range(1, 5):
        if i not in r: r[i] = {}
        r[i][s] = l.get(i, 0) + r.get(i - 1, {}).get(s, 0)

{1: {'Back to School 0812': 4000, 'Spring Savings 0413': 3000},
 2: {'Back to School 0812': 4000, 'Spring Savings 0413': 5000},
 3: {'Back to School 0812': 7000, 'Spring Savings 0413': 5000},
 4: {'Back to School 0812': 9000, 'Spring Savings 0413': 6000}}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this... very interesting! – tarastar42 Jul 29 '13 at 21:14
    
and concise, and that's counts :) – Roman Pekar Jul 29 '13 at 21:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.