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I wrote this query to tie product forecast data to historical shipment data in a Oracle star schema database and the optimizer did not behave in the way that I expected, so I am kind of curious as to what is going on.

Essentially, I have a bunch of dimension tables that will be consistent for both the forecast and the sales fact tables but the fact tables are aggregated at a different level, so I set them up as two subqueries and roll them up so I can tie them together (query example below.) In this case, I want all of the forecast data but only the sales data that matches.

The odd thing is that if I use either of the subqueries by themselves, they each seem to behave the way I would expect and each returns in less than a second (using the same filters -- I tested by just removing one or the other subquery and changing the alias).

Here is an example of the query structure -- I kept it as generic as I could, so there may be a few typos from changing it:

SELECT
     TIME_DIMENSION.GREGORIAN_DATE,
     LOCATION_DIMENSION.LOCATION_CODE,
     DESTINATION_DIMENSION.REGION,
     PRODUCT_DIMENSION.PRODUCT_CODE,
     SUM(NVL(FIRST_SUBQUERY.VALUE,0)) VALUE1,
     SUM(NVL(SECOND_SUBQUERY.VALUE,0)) VALUE2
FROM
     TIME_DIMENSION,
     LOCATION_DMENSION SOURCE_DIMENSION,
     LOCATION_DIMENSION DESTINATION_DIMENSION,
     PRODUCT_DIMENSION,
     (SELECT
        FORECAST_FACT.TIME_KEY,
        FORECAST_FACT.SOURCE_KEY,
        FORECAST_FACT.DESTINATION_KEY,
        FORECAST_FACT.PRODUCT_KEY,
        SUM(FORECAST_FACT.VALUE) AS VALUE,
     FROM FORECAST_FACT
     WHERE [FORECAST_FACT FILTERS HERE]
     GROUP BY
        FORECAST_FACT.TIME_KEY,
        FORECAST_FACT.SOURCE_KEY,
        FORECAST_FACT.DESTINATION_KEY) FIRST_SUBQUERY
LEFT JOIN
    (SELECT
        --This is just as an example offset
        (LAST_YEAR_FACT.TIME_KEY + 52) TIME_KEY,        
        LAST_YEAR_FACT.SOURCE_KEY,
        LAST_YEAR_FACT.DESTINATION_KEY,
        FORECAST_FACT.PRODUCT_KEY,
        SUM(LAST_YEAR_FACT.VALUE) AS VALUE,
     FROM LAST_YEAR_FACT
     WHERE [LAST_YEAR_FACT FILTERS HERE]
     GROUP BY
        LAST_YEAR_FACT.TIME_KEY,
        LAST_YEAR_FACT.SOURCE_KEY,
        LAST_YEAR_FACT.DESTINATION_KEY) SECOND_SUBQUERY
ON
    FORECAST_FACT.TIME_KEY = LAST_YEAR_FACT.TIME_KEY
    AND FORECAST_FACT.SOURCE_KEY = LAST_YEAR_FACT.SOURCE_KEY
    AND FORECAST_FACT.DESTINATION_KEY = LAST_YEAR_FACT.DESTINATION_KEY
    --I also tried to tie the last_year subquery to the dimension tables here
WHERE
    FORECAST_FACT.TIME_KEY = TIME_DIMENSION.TIME_KEY
    AND FORECAST_FACT.SOURCE_KEY = SOURCE_DIMENSION.LOCATION_KEY
    AND FORECAST_FACT.DESTINATION_KEY = DESTINATION_DIMENSION.LOCATION_KEY
    AND FORECAST_FACT.PRODUCT_KEY  = PRODUCT_DIMENSION.PRODUCT_KEY
    --I also tried, separately, to tie the last_year subquery to the dimension tables here
    AND TIME_DIMENSION.WEEK = 'VALUE'
    AND SOURCE_DIMENSION.SOURCE_CODE = 'VALUE'
    AND DESTINATION_DIMENSION.REGION IN ('VALUE', 'VALUE')
    AND PRODUCT_DIMENSION.CLASS_CODE = 'VALUE'
GROUP BY
    TIME_DIMENSION.GREGORIAN_DATE,
    SOURCE_DIMENSION.LOCATION_CODE,
    DESTINATION_DIMENSION.REGION,
    PRODUCT_DIMENSION.PRODUCT_CODE

Essentially, when I run either subquery independently it will utilize the indexes and search only a specific range of the specific partition, whereas with the left join it always does a full table scan on one of the fact tables. What seems to be happening is Oracle is applying the dimension table filters to only the first subquery -- and thus to do the left join it first needs to scan the entire sales table -- even if I explicitly tie and filter the values twice, instead of relying on the implicit filtering... I tried that. Am I thinking about this wrong? To me, the optimizer should use the indexes on both of the fact tables to filter each by the values in the WHERE clause and then left join the resulting subset.

I realize that I could simply add the filters to each of the subqueries, or set this up as a union of two independent queries, but I am curious as to what exactly is going on in terms of the optimization engine -- I can post the execution plan, if that would help.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
Might be because you're mixing ANSI joins and "old style" joins. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jul 29 '13 at 20:44
2  
Please carefully read this: stackoverflow.com/questions/11179991/…. The potential mess generated by your joins structure has to be sorted out first, otherwise we might as well be having to rethink everything the day you decide to standardise it. –  Sebas Jul 29 '13 at 21:08
    
Hmm, that's interesting! I actually had the entire thing using the old style joins, originally, and switched it for this example because I thought it would be more clear. I honestly have never considered the implication of mixing up join styles, though, and I have never had any issues in Oracle (I see a lot of queries that only use the old style for inner joins. It's easier, but it is a bad habit.) That said, I have tried both the new style and old style joins (and mixed), and that doesn't seem to have any impact on the execution plan –  Karter705 Jul 29 '13 at 22:11
    
I don't see a good reason why those subqueries even need to exist. I'm sure the optimizer is smart enough to put it back to the main query. In case it got confused, put it in the main query. I'm a fan of ANSI joins, it cleans up the WHERE clause so that it just shows filters. –  Robert Co Jul 29 '13 at 22:33
    
Put what back in the main query? The subqueries exist because of how the data needs to be aggregated. I oversimplified it a bit in this example, but basically the destination fact table is actually a customer table that I have to reference in the subquery so that I can aggregate it up to like a chain level (i.e. group all wal-marts together, instead of a specific wal-mart) before the left join occurs. You can't join it and then aggregate it, because you'd lose historical data where there was no forecast for the specific customer key. –  Karter705 Jul 30 '13 at 2:23

1 Answer 1

Be sure that the tables are all analysed. Do it again. The optimizer uses those values for calculating it's execution plan. In cases where Oracle really choose a wrong plan your workaround is to force the optimizer with hints /*+ ... */, specifying the use of indexes, join order, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay -- assuming the tables are all analyzed, does this seem like a case where the optimizer is choosing the wrong execution plan? I can definitely get the query to work correctly if I rewrite it or add hints, but I want to make sure I am not fundamentally misunderstanding how the optimizer is supposed to work in cases such as this. –  Karter705 Jul 29 '13 at 22:20

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