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I have an array with some elements being "repeats", and I want to delete repeats in the array.

So for example, the list (array) on the left turns into the array on the right:

Ingredients:             Ingredients:
Apples                   Apples
Apples                   Oranges
Oranges                  Bananas
Oranges
Oranges
Bananas 

What would be a good algorithm to do so?

Right now this is what my psuedocode looks like:

for each element in ingredients (counter j)
     for each element-below-current-element (counter k)
         if ingredients[i] == element-below-current-element[j]
             splice (delete) ingredients[i]

The problem right now though is that I noticed if the original list has an odd number of elements, then I might get something like this:

Ingredients:             Ingredients:
Apples                   Apples
Oranges                  Oranges
Oranges                  Oranges
Oranges                  Bananas
Bananas

Everything works except that I might get a double for one ingredient.

This is my actual code implementation, in javascript and with some angular elements (such as $scope), though it shouldn't really matter.

    for(var j = 0; j < $scope.groceryList.length; j++){
        for(var k = j+1; k < $scope.groceryList.length; k++){ // for each of elements below current element (j)
            if ( $scope.groceryList[j].name == $scope.groceryList[k].name){
                $scope.groceryList.splice(k, 1);
                }
            }
    }

Right now what's getting me is how the array length is decreased whenever you remove an array element, which results in your counter jumping one element forward on the next iteration and such...

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Thank you all for the answers! I will take a little time to go through them. –  Gnuey Jul 29 '13 at 21:09

8 Answers 8

Underscore.js is the tool I would recommend for doing all your array handling in JavaScript (and also, for, just, like, everything. It is awesome.)

It just so happens that its uniq method will do exactly what you need.

var myArray = ["Apples","Oranges","Oranges","Grapes","Apples"];
_.uniq(myArray);
//returns ["Apples","Oranges","Grapes"]
share|improve this answer
    
I like this. Underscore is the way I'd go as well. –  Vinay Jul 29 '13 at 20:45
    
Let the world know with a +1! –  itcouldevenbeaboat Jul 29 '13 at 20:46
    
Hahaha I did. :-) –  Vinay Jul 29 '13 at 20:47
    
Whoa. where does _.uniq(myArray); return the cleaned array to? Does it automatically update myArray or do I need to give it to something, i.e. myArray = _.uniq(myArray);? And is the underscore just syntax? –  Gnuey Jul 29 '13 at 21:09
    
UnderscoreJS is a library that assists in operations over collections. So you will need to include the library, and then its functions will be available to you via the _ variable. To look into _.uniq: underscorejs.org/#uniq –  Vinay Jul 29 '13 at 22:21

In this situation, you normally can't use a for loop for your inner loop. while works well, though:

for(var j = 0; j < $scope.groceryList.length; j++){
    var k = j+1;
    while(k < $scope.groceryList.length){ // each of elements below current element (j)
        if ( $scope.groceryList[j].name == $scope.groceryList[k].name){
            $scope.groceryList.splice(k, 1);
            }
        else {
            ++k;
            }
        }
}

If you splice, don't increment k. If you don't, do.

(I hope I got your indentation right, it's not a style I'm used to.)

share|improve this answer
    
Ohhhhhhh, wow. That's a clever simple way to do it. Pure and sweet. You got the indentation fine :) Thank you! I love all the different solutions this community has. –  Gnuey Jul 29 '13 at 21:30
    
@Gnuey: :-) Glad that helped. –  T.J. Crowder Jul 30 '13 at 2:48

I would just sort it and then compare like so....

var arr = ["Apples","Oranges","Oranges","Grapes","Apples"];
 var sorted_arr = arr.sort(); 

  var results = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < arr.length - 1; i++) {
    if (sorted_arr[i + 1] == sorted_arr[i]) {
    results.push(sorted_arr[i]);
  }
 }

alert(results);
share|improve this answer

This code is the simplest solution but requires double the amount of memory--not a problem for the small dataset in your example.

Array.prototype.filterDuplicates = function () {
    var filtered = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++)
        if (filtered.indexOf(this[i]) == -1)
            filtered.push(this[i]);
    return filtered;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh nice. Wasn't aware of the use of indexOf. Pretty usefull! –  Gnuey Jul 29 '13 at 21:53

my favorite way is to use array methods to save code:

arr1=[
    "Apples",
    "Apples",
    "Oranges",
    "Oranges",
    "Oranges",
    "Bananas"
];


var unq= arr1.filter(function unq(a,b,c){return c.indexOf(a)===b;});

alert(unq); // shows "Apples,Oranges,Bananas"

no vars, no artifacts, just logic and results.

EDIT: changed to use only one repetitive array. if you want to filter one array from another, just change "c.indexOf" above to the array's var name.

i prefer to break out the unq function so i can call .filter(unq) from anywhere to get a unique array...

share|improve this answer
    
wait, but I want to get arr2 from arr1. Actually, originally I was thinking of just shortening arr1. It seems that this solution assumes you already have the shortened list in arr2? –  Gnuey Jul 29 '13 at 21:14
    
@Gnuey: i misunderstood, but now it's even simpler! –  dandavis Jul 29 '13 at 21:16
    
Whoa, what is a, b, and c? Sorry I'm not familiar with the filter() function yet :( –  Gnuey Jul 29 '13 at 21:20
1  
these are generated by the filter method, and turn out to be a=index value, b=index, c=whole array. –  dandavis Jul 29 '13 at 21:24

Linear time, constant space algorithm:

  1. Have 2 indices (one fast and one slow), both starting from zero
  2. Increment both until the previous element is the same as the current one
  3. Increment the fast one until you find an element that's different
  4. Set the element at the slow index to the element at the fast index
  5. Increment both
  6. Increment the fast one until it's different from the replacing element
  7. Repeat from 4 until the fast one reaches the end.
  8. Shorten the list up to the short one

No, I can't give you the JavaScript.

Example:

Input:

Ingredients, Apples, Apples, Oranges, Oranges, Oranges, Bananas

Have 2 indices (one fast and one slow), both starting from zero

   fast
   slow
     V
Ingredients, Apples, Apples, Oranges, Oranges, Oranges, Bananas

Increment both until we the previous element is the same as the current one.

                     fast
                     slow
                       V
Ingredients, Apples, Apples, Oranges, Oranges, Oranges, Bananas

Increment fast until it's different.

                     slow     fast
                       V        V
Ingredients, Apples, Apples, Oranges, Oranges, Oranges, Bananas

Set element at slow to element at fast.

                     slow      fast
                       V         V
Ingredients, Apples, Oranges, Oranges, Oranges, Oranges, Bananas

Increment both.

                               slow     fast
                                 V        V
Ingredients, Apples, Oranges, Oranges, Oranges, Oranges, Bananas

Increment the fast one until it's different from the replacing element (Oranges)

                               slow                       fast
                                 V                          V
Ingredients, Apples, Oranges, Oranges, Oranges, Oranges, Bananas

Set element at slow to element at fast.

                               slow                       fast
                                 V                          V
Ingredients, Apples, Oranges, Bananas, Oranges, Oranges, Bananas

Increment both.

                                        slow                  fast
                                          V                     V
Ingredients, Apples, Oranges, Bananas, Oranges, Oranges, Bananas

Reached the end.

Shorten the list up to slow.

Ingredients, Apples, Oranges, Bananas
share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, really interesting algorithm! After the first "increment both", you typed four "oranges". Did you mean to do that? Thanks for adding this! –  Gnuey Jul 30 '13 at 0:48
1  
Yes, the second Apples got replaced by Oranges right above it. –  Dukeling Jul 30 '13 at 0:51
1  
Only works for a sorted/grouped array. This seems to be the case, but is not explicitly stated. –  jgroenen Jul 30 '13 at 8:48

Just do an existence check with an associative array:

var exists = {}, i;
for (i = 0; i < arr.length; i += 1) {
    if (exists[arr[i]]) {
        arr.splice(i, 1);
        i--;
    } else {
        exists[arr[i]] = true;
    }
}
// arr should now have no dupes
share|improve this answer

http://jsfiddle.net/XYsUm/

var ingredients = [
    "Apples",
    "Apples",
    "Oranges",
    "Oranges",
    "Oranges",
    "Bananas"
];

var uniqIngredients = {};

for (i in ingredients) {
    uniqIngredients[ingredients[i]] = true;
}

ingredients = [];

for (i in uniqIngredients) {
    ingredients.push(i);
}
share|improve this answer

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