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I have a simple class with some properties and I would like to be able to expose a select method in order to return another object, (just like linq select method does). For instance:

class Person
{
  public string Name{get; set;}
  public string Address {get; set;}
  public string City {get; set;}

  public TItem SelectProjection(..);
}

Person p = new Person();
var other = p.SelectProjection(p => new { p.Name, p.City}); 

Is this possible?

@@EDIT

I've a custom class for business logic, but I expose IList only to mantain my code decoupled (no IQueryable). So, if you want to execute some projection you can populate my property string with comma separator:

BusinessClass.SelectFields = "Name, Surname, City";

But by the way it's easy keying wrong property name, so I prefer lambda:

BusinessClass.SelectField = p => new {p.Name, p.Surname, p.City};
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So why not call Select? –  Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 29 '13 at 21:00
2  
Could you describe what you are trying to accomplish a little more? Currently it's unclear what you want to accomplish and why you wouldn't just use the select method as @PanagiotisKanavos suggests. –  Kevin Jul 29 '13 at 21:01
    
You aren't decoupling anything if you provide IList instead of IQueryable, quite the opposite. IList is a more specific interface than IQueryable, plus IList implies that the selection has already executed while IQueryable allows you to defer execution –  Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 29 '13 at 21:23
    
What??? IList is more specific interface than IQueryable?? :) –  bit Jul 29 '13 at 21:25
2  
@bit it is, actually. IList<T> makes specific promises about ordering and implies a materialized list. IQueryable is an abstraction over any IEnumerable, including IList –  Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 29 '13 at 21:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Hope this is what you mean.

public T SelectProjection<T>(Func<T> personFunc) 
{
        return personFunc();
}

 Person p = new Person();
 p.Address = "TestAdress";
 var x = p.SelectProjection<dynamic>(() => new {p.Address});

Output:

enter image description here

Example 2:

  Person p = new Person();
  p.Address = "TestAdress";
  p.City = "TestCity";
  var x = p.SelectProjection<dynamic>(() => new {p.Address, p.City});

Output:

enter image description here

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Yeah..It was really simple..Thank you. –  bit Jul 29 '13 at 21:37
    
You're welcome! Enjoy it:) –  Martijn van Put Jul 29 '13 at 21:38

Yes, this is possible. Research delegates, IEnumerable<T> and the yield return statement. Without knowing exactly what you are trying to accomplish, it's difficult to give a more precise answer.

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