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I apologize if this question is a duplicate - I searched for a while, but it's possible that my Google-fu just isn't up to snuff.

I am modifying a C++ program that calls into a C library. The C library allocates a bunch of memory (using malloc()), and the C++ program uses it and then frees it. The catch is that the C++ program can throw an exception midway through execution, causing the allocated memory to never be freed.

As a (rather contrived) example:

/* old_library.c */
char *allocate_lots() {
    char *mem = (char *)malloc(1024);
    return mem;
}

/* my_prog.cpp */
void my_class::my_func () {
    char *mem = allocate_lots();
    bool problem = use(mem);
    if (problem)
        throw my_exception("Oh noes! This will be caught higher up");
    free(mem);  // Never gets called if problem is true
}

My question is: how ought I to deal with this? My first idea was to wrap the whole thing in a try/catch block, and in the catch just check and free the memory and re-throw the exception, but this seems graceless and clunky to me (and wouldn't work well if I want to actually catch an exception). Is there a better way to do it?

EDIT: I probably should have mentioned that we're using g++ 4.2.2, from back in 2007 before std::unique_ptr was introduced. Chalk it up to corporate inertia.

share|improve this question
1  
Why can't you just free the memory before throwing the exception? –  Scotty Bauer Jul 29 '13 at 21:18
13  
Use RAII, problem solved. –  Borgleader Jul 29 '13 at 21:18

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use std::unique_ptr with a custom deleter that calls free:

class free_mem {
public:
    void operator()(char *mem) { free(mem); }
};

void my_class::my_func() {
    std::unique_ptr<char, free_mem> mem = allocate_lots();
share|improve this answer
    
This would probably be the right answer, except that we're using an old version of g++ (see the edit above). –  Dan Jul 29 '13 at 21:42
5  
Write your own unique_ptr replacement, then explain to your boss why you spent 2 days debugging a basic language tool that you would have gotten for free if they allowed upgrading. Repeat it until they start weighting the time wasted with outdated tools against the time spent upgrading. –  DanielKO Jul 29 '13 at 21:48

You should make sure that you don't throw until after you have freed the memory - or that you use a suitable smart pointer structure to store the mem, such that when the throw happens, and the stack unwinds, the mem gets freed.

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Wrap that rascal:

struct malloc_deleter {
  template <typename T>
  void operator () (T* p) const {
    free(p);
  }
};

void my_class::my_func () {
    std::unique_ptr<char[],malloc_deleter> mem{allocate_lots()};
    bool problem = use(mem.get());
    if (problem)
        throw my_exception("Oh noes! This will be caught higher up");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Mmm. Can you explain the use of char[]? –  sehe Jul 29 '13 at 21:33
    
unique_ptr<T[]> is a partial specialization that overloads operator [] instead of operator -> and uses delete[] by default (obvously not important here). –  Casey Jul 29 '13 at 21:36
    
I'm eternally confused with that, then. I thought shared_ptr had that. But apparently, they forgot to add the same for shared_ptr –  sehe Jul 29 '13 at 21:37
    
Correct. boost::shared_ptr has a T[] specialization, but it was added after the standard swallowed shared_ptr in TR1. (See this thread). –  Casey Jul 29 '13 at 21:38
    
This would probably be the right answer, except that we're using an old version of g++ (see the edit above). –  Dan Jul 29 '13 at 21:42

Since you're using an old compiler version that doesn't have unique_ptr, you can write your RAII wrapper yourself:

class ResourceWrapper {
public:
    ResourceWrapper(char* ptr) : m_ptr(ptr) {}
    ~ResourceWrapper() { free(m_ptr); }
    // whatever getters suit you, at the very least:
    char* get() const { return m_ptr; }
private:
    char* const m_ptr;
};

void my_class::my_func () {
    ResourceWrapper mem(allocate_lots());
    bool problem = use(mem.get());
    if (problem)
        throw my_exception("Oh noes! This will be caught higher up");
}

Just make sure not to allow copy/assignment even implicitly (which is why I made m_ptr const) or you'd risk ending up with double-freeing your memory ("move" semantics à la auto_ptr are best avoided unless you absolutely need it).

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Since you can't use std::unique_ptr, you could create your own deleter class that would control the lifetime of the pointer in RAII fashion. To keep it simple this example doesn't wrap the actual pointer but exists alongside it; a safer approach would be to make a true smart pointer class.

class AutoFree
{
public:
    AutoFree(void* p) : m_p(p)
    {
    }
    ~AutoFree()
    {
        free(m_p);
    }
private:
    void* m_p;
};

void my_class::my_func () {
    char *mem = allocate_lots();
    AutoFree mem_free(mem);
    bool problem = use(mem);
    if (problem)
        throw my_exception("Oh noes! This will be caught higher up");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Shown in action: ideone.com/iLgXdY –  Mark Ransom Jul 29 '13 at 22:13

Is there any reason not to simply free the memory inside the if clause?

if (problem) {
    free (mem);
    throw my_exception ("Drat!");
}
share|improve this answer
6  
Duplication of code, although in this specific case the free could really be moved before the conditional altogether. Long-term, there's a danger that someone unaware of what's going on here could insert another throw or return or call to another function that could throw without handling the fragile resource. RAII protects against the next guy being stupid. –  Casey Jul 29 '13 at 21:28

Use unique_ptr: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/view?id=cd3f0fc64d99cc07a2350e2ff9686500-542192d2d8aca3c820c7acc656fa0c68

#include <stdexcept>
#include <iostream>

#include <memory>

/* old_library.c */
char *allocate_lots()
{
    return static_cast<char*>(malloc(1024));
}

struct my_exception : virtual std::exception {
    const char* const msg;
    my_exception(const char* const msg) : msg(msg) {}
    const char* what() const noexcept { return msg; }
};

struct my_class
{
    struct Free { void operator() (char* p) const { free(p); } };
    /* my_prog.cpp */
    void my_func()
    {
        std::unique_ptr<char, Free> mem;

        mem.reset(allocate_lots());
        bool problem = use(mem.get());

        if(problem)
        {
            throw my_exception("Oh noes! This will be caught higher up");
        }
    }

    static bool use(char*) { return true; }
};

int main()
{
    my_class prog;
    prog.my_func();
}
share|improve this answer
2  
@Dan replace unique_ptr by boost::scoped_ptr if you don't have it –  sehe Jul 29 '13 at 21:47

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