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I have the following function below that creates multiple check boxes in a table. Problem: I cannot get the value for each box checked.

function createRoutesTable(result)
    {
        var length = result.jsonList.length;
        var tablecontents = "";
        console.log(length);
        tablecontents ="<table>";
        for(var i = 0; i < length; i++)
        {
            tablecontents += "<tr>"
            tablecontents += "<td><input type='checkbox' id='checkbox_"+ i + "' value='" + result.jsonList[i].Id +"' onclick = 'createAlerts()'><td>"
            tablecontents += "</tr>"
        }
        tablecontents +="</table>";
        document.getElementById("tablespace").innerHTML = tablecontents;

    }

Here is my function below:

function createAlerts()
{

     if( $('#checkbox_1').is(':checked'))
     {
         alert($(this).val());
     }

}

This will work for the first box, but I need a way for everytime I click any box, it will grab the appropriate value. I really don't want to have to write brittle code and write this if statement for each checkbox I created. That's really bad.

Put another way, no matter if I click checkbox_3 or checkbox_6, I will get the value for that checkbox. I thought about trying it this way, but I need this to work with a function when I use "onclick", so I got stuck.

Please help. I will give + rep where I can on responses to this question.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Given you are using plain JavaScript everywhere else, why not stick with it? Pass the current checkbox as a parameter.

With the least amount of change you can do something similar to this:

function createAlerts(theCheckbox) {
    if (theCheckbox.checked) {
        alert(theCheckbox.value);
    }
}

Update your binding code to include this:

onclick = 'createAlerts(this)'

DEMO - Using plain JavaScript


Either go with jQuery or plain JavaScript but mixing getElementById and jQuery selectors is more than confusing when maintaining the code in the long run.

If you want to use a more jQuery orientated solution for the binding you can use on() with delegation.

jQuery in this case sets the context of this to the clicked element so you don't need to manually pass the parameter, similar to this.

function createAlerts() {
    if (this.checked) {
        alert(this.value);
    }
}

You can then change your current binding function, leaving out the inline createAlert binding, similar to this:

function createRoutesTable(result) {
    var length = result.jsonList.length;
    var tablecontents = "";
    console.log(length);
    tablecontents = "<table>";
    for (var i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        tablecontents += "<tr>"
        tablecontents += "<td><input type='checkbox' id='checkbox_"+ i + "' value='" + result.jsonList[i].Id +"'><td>"
        tablecontents += "</tr>"
    }
    tablecontents += "</table>";
    document.getElementById("tablespace").innerHTML = tablecontents;
}

Then when the DOM is ready bind the click event using on(), similar to this:

$(document).ready(function () {
    $('#tablespace').on('click', 'table tr td [id^="checkbox_"]', createAlerts);
});

DEMO - Using jQuery on()


The createAlerts function still uses this directly as there is no need for the additional overhead in wrapping a jQuery selector around the element $(this) when accessing native attributes.

The ^ is the attribute-starts-with selector, selecting any element starting with an id of checkbox_ inside a dynamically generated table tr td.

The above uses on() with delegation, binding the click event to the closest static parent element, assuming above #tablespace but targeting the dynamic generated checkboxes within.

If #tablespace is also dynamic use $(document).on(....) or $('body').on(....) instead.

share|improve this answer

Just use jQuery to bind the events . And remove the inline event bind to it.

This should also work for dynamically added elements

$(document).on('click', '[id^=checkbox]', function() {
     if( $(this).is(':checked'))  //  or  this.checked
     {
         alert($(this.).val());
     }

});
share|improve this answer
    
If I click checkbox_1, and then later I click checkbox_2. Even if I unchecked checkbox_1, I will get the alert for checkbox_2 twice. Is there a way I can reset this after I do an alert? – GeekyOmega Jul 29 '13 at 22:22
1  
I don't see how this could happen, the event handler is only firing for the element which has triggered the event (ie the checkbox which changed state). If you're getting all the alerts, you must be iterating through all the checkboxes, or storing the state somewhere. Have a look at my example which does what I think you're asking, it has some logging on the page so you can see the handlers without having to ok lots of alerts. jsfiddle.net/jbergler/JzQJg – Jonas Bergler Jul 29 '13 at 22:29
    
Yes, I am saving $(this).val() as a var within the function. That must be messing up things somehow. – GeekyOmega Jul 29 '13 at 22:42

Because you inputs were added after dom you cannot call them directly. .on can delegate. So try this code:

function createAlerts()
{
     $(document).on('change',input[type=checkbox],function(){
         if( $(this).is(':checked'))
         {
             alert($(this.).val());
         }
    });
}
share|improve this answer

I would just give it a class....

In this line...

 tablecontents += "<td><input type='checkbox' class='check' id='checkbox_"+ i + "' value='" + result.jsonList[i].Id +"'><td>"

Then in your jquery

  $(document).on('click','.check', function(){
   if($(this).is(':checked')){
    alert($(this).val());}
  });

Or with your function...

$(document).on('click','.check', createAlerts);
share|improve this answer
    
Why add a class simply to match nodes? You can use the :checkbox selector and if you need to be specific narrow it down #parentId > :checkbox – Jonas Bergler Jul 29 '13 at 22:25

You can bind a handler to the click event on your checkboxes, jquery also supports delegated event handlers (with .on()) which let you bind to all matches on a selector even if new nodes are created after the call.

Here's an example: http://jsfiddle.net/jbergler/JzQJg/

//dynamically bind to any 'checkbox' elements for a click handler
$(document).on("click", ":checkbox", function (e) {
    var checked = $(this).is(":checked") ? "yes" : "no";
    $("#log").append("Click on element: " + $(this).attr('id') + " Checked: " + checked + "\n");
});
share|improve this answer

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