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At the moment I have two files in a folder on my webserver, one is called password.php. The file contains one line:

   <?php $password = 'my_password' ?>

The other php file contains script that I only want to execute if the correct password parameter is posted to the page. I have it set up like this

<?php require 'password.php';

if (isset($_POST["Password"]) & $_POST["Password"] == $password){
//Execute code...
}

else {
echo "Error";
}

?>

Now my question is if this a secure way of ensuring unwanted people cannot execute the script on the page by manually posting info to it? I was told that if the scripting processor became disabled the server could send the raw script back to the server. Does that mean people could purposely disable the processor on www.mysite.com/directory/password.php and see the value of the $password variable?

I was told to: "place password.php it in a separate file and store it in a directory located above the www directory. Then it would only be accessible via the local file system and not via HTTP from the outside world."

What exactly is meant by the above suggestion? Should I be doing anything to make the password more secure?

share|improve this question
1  
How does the folder structure look when you connect to your hosting provider with ftp (or whichever protocol you use to transfer files)? Normally you would have /yourUserName/public, or public_html, where you upload all your files that should be available at yourdomain.com. You could place config files (pretty much all server side files actually) outside of the public dir. That means if I go to yourdomain.com/config.php, it's not there. – JimL Jul 29 '13 at 22:50
    
Partial answer: What this means "...located above the www directory", is to place it inside your cgi-bin for example, instead of your public_html folder. For instance, I still use .txt for storing information and is protected by my .htaccess file. The .txt file(s) are stored in a sub-folder of my cgi-bin folder and protected by .htaccess as well. – Fred -ii- Jul 29 '13 at 22:51
1  
not a good way to secure a site. there is a rule. NEVER use a password hardcoded in your code. Someone could access the files on the server and could read your password – sinaneker Jul 29 '13 at 22:56
    
By the way, this line if (isset($_POST["Password"]) & $_POST["Password"] == $password)){ will throw you an error. See if you can figure out why, or, was that (the syntax error) an intentional typo? – Fred -ii- Jul 29 '13 at 22:57
    
@sinaneker Do you have any links/info about the difference between storing a password hard coded outside the public dir, and storing it in the DB? I agree it should be hashed, but I fail to see that the place it's stored matters. If anything I believe the DB is the layer most often compromised on websites, in which case you get the password. And if you get to the files, well then you get to the database as well. Or how do you suggest storing user credentials for the database? – JimL Jul 29 '13 at 23:01

To answer your question, what you were told was to place it outside of the web-accessible space. This means that if your web server has a document root set at /var/www/site, then you should store it outside of that directory, perhaps in /var/www/data, because the latter directory cannot possibly be accessed by a remote HTTP client.

A couple of suggestions:

The password should not be stored in plain text. It should be stored as a hash. Maybe something like this:

<?php $password = some-hash; ?>

Where "some-hash" is a hash of the actual password generated using crypt(), like crypt("password").

Then your check code would look like this:

<?php require '../password.php';

if (isset($_POST["Password"]) && crypt($_POST["Password"]) == $password) {
    //Execute code...
} else {
    echo "Error";
}

?>

The above is just an example.. check the PHP manual for the crypt() function for more information on how to use this for best security.

For security purposes, the type of storage (PHP file, database, etc) doesn't really matter. What matters is that the password is not accessible by a browser, and that it is not stored in clear-text.

share|improve this answer
    
FYI: You kept the same syntax errors as the OP. So theoretically, your answer (code) will also throw out an error message. See if you can find them also. (wink). P.s.: If you receive any downvotes, it will NOT have come from me. Just saying. – Fred -ii- Jul 29 '13 at 23:37
    
Thanks for the heads up, but when I write this out to a file on my local system called "test2.php" and run "php -l test2.php", it returns "No syntax errors detected in test2.php". IOW, according to PHP, there are no syntax errors. So if you could point them out, I'd much appreciate it. – Nick Coons Jul 29 '13 at 23:42
    
You're quite welcome. However, have you fully tested the OP's (and your) code? Of course it won't throw an error, ask yourself why. ;-) – Fred -ii- Jul 29 '13 at 23:49
    
I tested my code to verify that it would run, I didn't test the functionality since it wasn't crucial to my point. The error is the single ampersand in the if conditional (which I've edited and fixed). This is not a syntax error though, which is what you originally indicated :-). Syntax errors cause the interpreter to throw an error. – Nick Coons Jul 29 '13 at 23:54
    
Well done! Yet, is it not a "syntax error", or have I used the wrong term? Or maybe I should have used "error in syntax writing"? – Fred -ii- Jul 30 '13 at 0:00

Perhaps not a useful answer but a good tip: never ever ever ever use a hardcoded php variable to store a password. Use htpasswd, above the web directory or store the password in a database hashed at bear minimum.

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How does the folder structure look when you connect to your hosting provider with ftp (or whichever protocol you use to transfer files)? Normally you would have something like

/yourUserName/public
or
/yourUserName/public_html

where you upload all your files that should be available at yourdomain.com. You could place config files (pretty much all server side files actually) outside of the public dir. That means if I go to yourdomain.com/config.php, it's not there.

I usually place my entire app outside the public dir, so it looks something like this

/userName/app
  controllers
  models
  templates
  views
  config.php
  router.php

/userName/public
  css
  js
  index.php

Then I usually do something like this in index.php: require '../app/config.php';

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