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newbie in javascript closure

i follow a example from internet, and try to change some of it

i think it should give me 16,17,18,19

but the result was unexpect

here is my code. i do not know why i first call bar2(10),it alert 17, does it should give me 18?


function foo(x) {
    var tmp = 3;
    return function (y) {
        alert(x + y + (++tmp));
    }
}
var bar = foo(2); 
bar(10);//alert16
bar(10);//alert17
var bar2 =  foo(3);
bar2(10);//alert17
bar2(10);//alert18
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The result 17 is correct.

Each call to foo produces a new function with a new closed-over variable tmp.

Perhaps you thought the second call to foo uses the same tmp as in the first call? It doesn't. That is why you get 17: 3 + 10 + 4.

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so it's same as "var bar2 = new foo(3)" ? –  Marcos Bao Jul 30 '13 at 2:59
    
No, the operator new in JavaScript does a lot behind the scenes: it creates a new object, calls the function in a context where this refers to the new object, sets the prototype of the new object to the value of foo.prototype, and will implicitly return the new object under certain conditions. None of which applies to your question. All that happens when you say var bar2 = foo(3) is that you call the function foo. But each time you call foo it gets its own copies of its local variables (of which tmp is one). That happens even without closures. –  Ray Toal Jul 30 '13 at 5:43
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Because tmp is a variable local to the function you return from foo -- that means when you call foo for the second time, it gets reset to 3. 3 + (3+1) + 10 = 17.

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  1. bar(y) = n = x + y + tmp
  2. bar(10) = 16 = 2 + 10 + 4
  3. bar(10) = 17 = 2 + 10 + 5
  4. bar2(10) = 17 = 3 + 10 + 4
  5. bar2(10) = 18 = 3 + 10 + 5
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