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I've read quite a few different posts about overriding the init method hoping to find answers for a couple of syntax questions I've been unable to figure out.

(id) init
{
    self = [super init];
    if(self){

    }
    return self;
}

So when we send the init method to the superclass of our subclass (let's assume superclass is NSObject) we are initializing all the instance variables inherited from the superclass? What else does this accomplish?

Whenever we create a new class, are we always inheriting instance variables from the parent class? For instance if I create a class called Fraction...

Fraction : NSObject
Fraction * myFrac = [[Fraction alloc] init]

Does the object that myFrac is referencing automatically inherit instance variables that I haven't even declared yet from the parent class?

Lastly when doing

self = [super init];

Aren't we initializing the superclass? What exactly are we storing in self? Is the result of init a pointer to our newly initialized object of our subclass?

I know this has been asked quite a few times, but I couldn't find these answers in the explanations. Sorry for the pileup of questions.

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2 Answers 2

So when we send the init method to the superclass of our subclass (let's assume superclass is NSObject) we are initializing all the instance variables inherited from the superclass?

By default all ivars are set to nil/NULL/0/0.0/NO, depending on their type, yet your parent class may want to have them set to something else by default, in that case it will change their value in its init method.

What else does this accomplish?

Whatever NSObject (or your parent class) wants to do when a new object is initialized. Basically the convention says, you must not use an object that has not been initialized (with the exception of release - you may release an object that has never been initialized, that is explicitly allowed). Most other languages know the concept of contsructors, e.g. in Java you'd say new String(...) to create a string object, which does two things: It creates a new string object and it initializes the object by calling its constructor. Java will not allow you to do one thing without doing the other one. In Obj-C these two things are individual steps. alloc creates a new object and init initializes it. Offering two separate steps has advantages in some cases, but it also has the disadvantage that you must rely on conventions (init must be called before the object may be used, yet it must never be called more than once; the compiler will enforce neither one, though, at least not last time I checked that).

Whenever we create a new class, are we always inheriting instance variables from the parent class?

Yes; unless NSObject doesn't have any. Most ivars in Obj-C are private, protected is already a huge exception and you hardly ever see public ones. So basically you should never directly access the ivar of your parent class and thus you don't really have to care if you inherit any or none.

self = [super init];

Aren't we initializing the superclass? What exactly are we storing in self? Is the result of init a pointer to our newly initialized object of our subclass?

An init method is allowed to return a different object than the one the method has been called for. E.g. the following is valid:

static MyClass * ThereIsOnlyOneIstance;

- (id)init
{
  if (ThereIsOnlyOneInstance) {
    [self release];
    return [ThereIsOnlyOneInstance retain]; // Without retain if using ARC
  }

  self = [super init];
  if (!self) return nil;

  ThereIsOnlyOneInstance = [self retain]; // Just `= self` if using ARC
  return self;
}

The following two if-statements will be true:

MyClass a = [[MyClass alloc] init];
MyClass b = [MyClass alloc];

if (a != b) NSLog(@"a != b will be true");

b = [b init];

if (a == b) NSLog(@"Now a == b will be true");

Also an init method may fail, in which case it must release the object and return nil. So when calling [super init] this method may fail. Don't think too much about why it may fail, just keep in mind that it may fail. Now assume that you write the following code:

- (id)init
{
  [super init]; // BAD!!! THIS IS BROKEN!!!
                // Recent versions of CLANG will even make this
                // a hard compiler error and refuse to compile that.
  return self;
}

If [super init] failed, the object has been released and nil was returned, but you haven't updated self, you just return whatever value used to be in self prior to calling [super init]. As a result, you return a pointer to a dead object, since at the memory location self points to is no object any longer, this is a dangling pointer and using it can cause your app to crash or otherwise malfunction.

That's why you always must write the output of another init method back to self. Same is true for calling init from outside. The following code is broken:

MyClass x = [MyClass alloc];
[x init]; // BAD!!! THIS BROKEN!!!

It is broken, since init may release the object x points to, so x is now a dangling pointer. You always must capture the output of init back to the variable that should point to the object. The following code is correct:

MyClass x = [MyClass alloc];
x = [x init];

Though usually you alloc/init in just one combined call, of course:

MyClass x = [[MyClass alloc] init];

but that's actually the same, the compiler generated code will look no different than before.

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Actually, that last part isn't true. -init is atomic according to the latest CLANG spec, which means there's an implicit retain-release around the method, meaning you can call [super init] without assignment and not have to worry about "dead pointers." Besides, ARC is smart enough to optimize calls like that away, –  CodaFi Jul 30 '13 at 19:04
    
@CodaFi First: Obj-C is not bound to CLANG at all, you can as well compile it with GCC (still possible, even in latest Xcode). Second: The latest spec is not relevant for the general language specification, since you may as well use an older release of clang. Third: I was not excitedly talking about ARC, you can still (and often have) use Obj-C without ARC. Fourth: Using the latest Xcode, I even get a hard compiler error if I write [super init] and don't store the result back to self. So I don't even think your statement is true to begin with. –  Mecki Jul 30 '13 at 20:38
    
You seem to discount the fact that even though the latest spec and compiler don't matter to the language, they are still officially sanctioned, and even forced upon us. Your argument is tantamount to "well, technically I can write a compiler for C++ as it existed in Bell Labs in '79, and it'll still be relevant." If I want to code in ObjC 1.0, you're right, I can. But is it practical? Finally, isn't it a bit hypocritical to argue the against the latest materials, and yet cite them to refute my claims? Allow me to rephrase: calling through to super is unnecessary. –  CodaFi Jul 31 '13 at 0:19
2  
@CodaFi Apple is the one that defines the Obj-C language and Apple says on its documentation pages, that you MUST call [super init] and that you MUST assign the result back to self. If you don't do that, you violate the language specs, regardless what your compiler may or may not do; period. And your original statement that you can call [super init] without assigning the value back to self is simply dead wrong, since the compiler will refuse to compile that; period. –  Mecki Jul 31 '13 at 9:21
    
@Mecki Very true, there are also some valid use cases when the init method doesn't return self but a whole different object... or nil. It would be very wrong to ignore the result of [super init] and just return self since self could already be deallocated. –  Sulthan Jul 31 '13 at 9:30

So when we send the init method to the superclass of our subclass (lets assume superclass is NSObject) we are initializing all the instance variables inherited from the superclass? what else does this accomplish?

No. The runtime initializes all variables in an Objective-C context to nil for you (rather than a garbage value without explicit initialization under the C and C++ runtimes). -init exists for setup, and it actually unnecessary for direct subclasses of NSObject, as the default -init method returns self and exits. That said, -init and those methods in its family are often necessary to initialize the member variables and setup state of objects further down the inheritance chain. Don't think of it as a companion to +alloc, rather just a handy setup method that's become the norm in the language.

Does the object that myFrac is referencing automatically inherit instance variables that I haven't even declared yet from the parent class?

If by "inherits" you mean that any variables you create still maintain the offset that their superclass hands them, then yes. If by "inherits" you mean "gives access to", then it depends. The @public, @private, and @protected directives determine the access rights a derived class gets to the instance variables of its parents.

Aren't we initializing the super class?

Yes, but understand that init and friends do not actually allocate memory, or setup anything language-specific. They just setup, hand off self, and walk away.

What exactly are we storing in self?

We're storing the object allocated by +alloc and returned to us by NSObject in the form of self. Calling through to super just gives the superclass an opportunity to run its setup, then pass us back a self pointer so we can do our setup.

Is the result of init a pointer to our newly initialized object of our subclass?

Oh, I sure hope so.

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I need a bit more clarification: "Yes, but understand that init and friends do not actually allocate memory, or setup anything internal, they just hand you self and walk away." So init is pretty much returning the result of alloc to self? I get confused when you say it "returns self" because up to that point self has no value until we set it equal to [super init], right? "If by "inherits" you mean that any variables you create still maintain the offset that their superclass hands them, then yes." What do you mean by offset? –  Brosef Jul 30 '13 at 5:03
    
1) self is a convenience that the language provides you as a way to get a pointer to the current object. When I say something returns self, I mean that it just hands you back the pointer to the current object. self always has a value so long as alloc is called. Go ahead and try to assign to a variable like Foo *obj = [Foo alloc];, then try to call any methods that use self. It's defined because alloc is the method that actually creates you an object and sets up self. init does no actual initialization –  CodaFi Jul 30 '13 at 6:32
    
2) Objects are just smarter structures, and structure members have offsets. Internally, your object inherits all the members of the superclass, which means the offsets for it's member variables depends on it's superclass. –  CodaFi Jul 30 '13 at 6:34
    
thanks for that explanation. Everything is becoming more clear except for one thing: when we send init to the superclass, what exactly is happening to all the subclasses below the superclass? What is happening in the background that is causing the init message to the superclass to effect all the subclasses? Originally, I thought by sending init to the superclass, we could cause a trickle down effect, that would initialize all the subclasses under the superclass. –  Brosef Jul 30 '13 at 7:06
    
Why would init affect subclasses? It's a method call, and one that just happens to return self. When you call through to super, you aren't magically changing the objects above or below the current class, you're just saying "here superclass, setup your internal crap, but promise me you'll give me back my self pointer unharmed so I can do the same." Ideally, init has no side effects. And it doesn't trickle down, it flows up. –  CodaFi Jul 30 '13 at 7:16

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