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I have a vector v and I want to remove the maximum value of the vector v from v. I can find that how many times each value repeated , but how can I remove maximum value of v from v in R?

v = c(0.25, 0.25, 0.3, 0.3, 0.3, 5, 6, 6.5, 8, 8, 8)
max(v)
[1] 8
j = as.numeric(unname(table(v)))
j
[1] 2 3 1 1 1 3

Also, if I have another vector a which is

a = rep(1, length(v))

with same length as v, and I want to remove the last 3 ones , what should I do?

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1  
It is not appropriate to use a thread as a running place to ask questions. Once a question has been answered please open a new thread to ask a new question. –  Tyler Rinker Jul 31 '13 at 17:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

An alternative

v[v < max(v)]
[1] 0.25 0.25 0.30 0.30 0.30 5.00 6.00 6.50
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Congratulations for the 10k. –  agstudy Jul 30 '13 at 4:01
    
Congrats and your approach is the fastest +1 –  Tyler Rinker Jul 30 '13 at 4:03
    
@Tyler, are you sure about that? My intuition tells me that < should not be faster than !=. When I use microbenchmark, I don't think I am seeing any statistically significant difference... –  flodel Jul 30 '13 at 5:02
    
@thelatemail: Thanks for youy reply. If I have another vector a = rep(1, length(v)) with same length as v , and I want to remove the last 3 ones , what should I do? –  rose Jul 30 '13 at 5:36
    
@rose - you shouldn't use the comments section to ask new questions - but head(a,-3) should do it. –  thelatemail Jul 30 '13 at 5:54

Likely logical indexing is faster here:

v[v != max(v)]

## > v[v != max(v)]
## [1] 0.25 0.25 0.30 0.30 0.30 5.00 6.00 6.50

Edit Wanted to add the bench marks:

v <- rep(c(0.25, 0.25, 0.3, 0.3, 0.3, 5, 6, 6.5, 8, 8, 8), 10000) #repeat 10,000 x

a <-function() v[v != max(v)]
b <-function() v[-which(v == max(v))]
d <- function() v[!v== max(v)]
e <- function() v[v < max(v)]
f <- function() v[which(v != max(v))]
g <- function() v[which(v < max(v))]

On 100 replications with the microbenchmark package (win 7 machine):

## Unit: milliseconds
##  expr      min       lq   median       uq       max neval
##   a() 2.854048 2.990731 3.200889 4.734276 54.814676   100
##   b() 3.268299 3.487321 3.642666 5.241360  6.254832   100
##   d() 3.016389 3.265034 3.454200 5.027703 54.879986   100
##   e() 2.748151 2.892300 3.095694 4.475367  5.394139   100
##   f() 2.047936 2.208645 2.423001 3.967349 54.291730   100
##   g() 1.948105 2.208178 2.352093 3.860988  4.995748   100

EDIT (arun)

Logical indexing a vector, as far as I've seen, is slower than using "which" and indexing on the elements directly. That is what makes the difference. I also created a post here to understand why, and I'd like an answer if someone has one... :)

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+1 and you are faster with 4 secs.. –  agstudy Jul 30 '13 at 3:59
    
Yours was slightly different and I benched it and it came in only slightly behind mine. –  Tyler Rinker Jul 30 '13 at 4:00
    
Interesting benchmarking! –  agstudy Jul 30 '13 at 4:07
    
Nice comparisons - I wouldn't have expected such an obvious difference between a() and e() –  alexwhan Jul 30 '13 at 4:14
    
@alexwhan - It should be noted that it's only fractions of seconds different when processing upwards of a million cases. While a bit of fun, it's probably not overly concerning. –  thelatemail Jul 30 '13 at 4:21
v[-which(v == max(v))]
# [1] 0.25 0.25 0.30 0.30 0.30 5.00 6.00 6.50

which(v == max(v)) returns the positions of v that are equal to the maximum value:

which(v == max(v))
[1]  9 10 11

So we're just saying remove values that are in these positions.

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1  
even shorter v[-which.max(v)] –  haki Jul 30 '13 at 6:45
    
@haki that only seems to remove the last 8, not all three 8's. –  Mark Miller Jul 30 '13 at 6:57
1  
@Mark Miller to nitpick, I think it removes the first 8 not the last one as ?which.max indicates that it gives the index of the first maximum. –  orizon Jul 30 '13 at 7:47

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