Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm sorry if this is a repeat question but I already tried to search for an answer and came up empty handed. So basically I just want to add strings (single words) to the back of a vector and then display the stored strings as a single string. I am quite the rookie.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <cctype>
using namespace std;


int main(int a, char* b [])
{
    vector<string> userString;      
    string word;        
    string sentence = "";           
    for (decltype(userString.size()) i = 0; i <= userString.size() - 1; i++)
    {
        cin >> word;
        userString.push_back(word);
        sentence += userString[i] + " ";
    }
    cout << sentence;
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

Why doesn't this work?

EDIT

int main(int a, char* b [])
{
    cout << "Enter a sequence of words. Enter '.' \n";
    vector<string> userString;      
    string word;                    
    string sentence = "";           /
    int wordCount = 0;
    while (getline(cin, word))
    {
        if (word == ".")
        {
            break;
        }
        userString.push_back(word);
    }
    for (decltype(userString.size()) i = 0; i <= userString.size() - 1; i++)
    {
        sentence += userString[i] + " ";
        wordCount += 1;
        if (wordCount == 8)
        {
            sentence = sentence + "\n";
                    wordCount = 0;
        }
    }
    cout << sentence << endl; 
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

So my new program works. It just puts values at the back of a vector and prints them out 8 words to a line. I know there's easier ways but I'm just learning vectors and I'm going in baby steps. Thanks for the help guys.

share|improve this question
    
"Thanks for the help guys.", so why don't you mark the "Answer" then? –  JackBauer Sep 2 at 1:25

5 Answers 5

Because userString is empty. You only declare it

vector<string> userString;     

but never add anything, so the for loop won't even run.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for pointing that out. –  RudolphRedNose Jul 30 '13 at 17:11

Your vector<string> userString has size 0, so the loop is never entered. You could start with a vector of a given size:

vector<string> userString(10);      
string word;        
string sentence;           
for (decltype(userString.size()) i = 0; i < userString.size(); ++i)
{
    cin >> word;
    userString[i] = word;
    sentence += userString[i] + " ";
}

although it is not clear why you need the vector at all:

string word;        
string sentence;           
for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
{
    cin >> word;
    sentence += word + " ";
}

If you don't want to have a fixed limit on the number of input words, you can use std::getline in a while loop, checking against a certain input, e.g. "q":

while (std::getline(std::cin, word) && word != "q")
{
    sentence += word + " ";
}

This will add words to sentence until you type "q".

share|improve this answer
    
To note, even if it had a size it wouldn't work because he's doing push_backs and not assignments to indices. –  Borgleader Jul 30 '13 at 4:14
    
@Borgleader sure, one would have to assign via operator[]. –  juanchopanza Jul 30 '13 at 4:17
    
thank you for pointing out that I was attempting to assign to an empty vector. The reason I have used a vector is because I am teaching myself and I just reached the topic of vectors. I am well aware that there is an easier way to do it. By the way, your reminding me of getline() helped me out more than you think. –  RudolphRedNose Jul 30 '13 at 17:09

You have to insert the elements using the insert method present in vectors STL, check the below program to add the elements to it, and you can use in the same way in your program.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string.h>

int main ()
{
  std::vector<std::string> myvector ;
  std::vector<std::string>::iterator it;

   it = myvector.begin();
  std::string myarray [] = { "Hi","hello","wassup" };
  myvector.insert (myvector.begin(), myarray, myarray+3);

  std::cout << "myvector contains:";
  for (it=myvector.begin(); it<myvector.end(); it++)
    std::cout << ' ' << *it;
    std::cout << '\n';

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your input. –  RudolphRedNose Jul 30 '13 at 17:06
    
You are welcome, pls accept if you like it...:) –  Mahesh Jul 30 '13 at 17:14

You ask two questions; your title says "Displaying a vector of strings", but you're not actually doing that, you actually build a single string composed of all the strings and output that.

Your question body asks "Why doesn't this work".

It doesn't work because your for loop is constrained by "userString.size()" which is 0, and you test your loop variable for being "userString.size() - 1". The condition of a for() loop is tested before permitting execution of the first iteration.

int n = 1;
for (int i = 1; i < n; ++i) {
    std::cout << i << endl;
}

will print exactly nothing.

So your loop executes exactly no iterations, leaving userString and sentence empty.

Lastly, your code has absolutely zero reason to use a vector. The fact that you used "decltype(userString.size())" instead of "size_t" or "auto", while claiming to be a rookie, suggests you're either reading a book from back to front or you are setting yourself up to fail a class.

So to answer your question at the end of your post: It doesn't work because you didn't step through it with a debugger and inspect the values as it went. While I say it tongue-in-cheek, I'm going to leave it out there.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks I know it could be done another possible way but I'm teaching myself and I just started vectors and this was a kind of practice thing. I have since, due to your input and those of others, accomplished my task so thank you. –  RudolphRedNose Jul 30 '13 at 17:04

vector.size() returns the size of a vector. You didn't put any string in the vector before the loop , so the size of the vector is 0. It will never enter the loop. First put some data in the vector and then try to add them. You can take input from the user for the number of string user wants to enter.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <cctype>
using namespace std;


int main(int a, char* b [])
{
    vector<string> userString;
    string word;
    string sentence = "";
    int SIZE;
    cin>>SIZE;    //what will be the size of the vector
    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
    {
        cin >> word;
        userString.push_back(word);
        sentence += userString[i] + " ";
    }
    cout << sentence;
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

another thing, actually you don't have to use a vector to do this.Two strings can do the job for you.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <cctype>
using namespace std;


int main(int a, char* b [])
{
   // vector<string> userString;
    string word;
    string sentence = "";
    int SIZE;
    cin>>SIZE;    //what will be the size of the vector
    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
    {
        cin >> word;
        sentence += word+ " ";
    }
    cout << sentence;
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

and if you want to enter string until the user wish , code will be like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <cctype>
using namespace std;


int main(int a, char* b [])
{
   // vector<string> userString;
    string word;
    string sentence = "";
    //int SIZE;
    //cin>>SIZE;    //what will be the size of the vector
    while(cin>>word)
    {
        //cin >> word;
        sentence += word+ " ";
    }
    cout << sentence;
  //  system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why bother reading the size from the user, why not just read strings until the user stops entering them? And why is your variable shouting? size is a better name than SIZE –  Jonathan Wakely Jul 30 '13 at 8:01
    
thanks for the input –  RudolphRedNose Jul 30 '13 at 17:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.