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I'm trying to work out where the best place to run a long-running load operation is using Durandal.

From what I can tell, the general recommendation for loading data is in the ViewModel's activate method, which is what I usually do - something like:

viewModel.activate = function () {
    var loadPromise = myService.loadData();

    return $.when(loadPromise).then(function (loadedData) {
        viewModel.data(data);
    });
};

I know that if I don't return the promise here, then there's usually problems with the bindings - as this question and answer indicates.

However, executing a long running load operation in the activate method makes the app "freeze" while the load operation completes. For example, what if my load was now something like this?

viewModel.activate = function () {
    // All loads return a promise
    var firstLoad = myService.loadFirstData();
    var secondLoad = myService.loadSecondData();
    var thirdLoad = myService.loadThirdDataWhichTakesAges();

    return $.when(firstLoad, secondLoad, thirdLoad).then(function (one, two, three) {
        viewModel.one(one);
        viewModel.two(two);
        viewModel.three(three);
    });
};

In this scenario, the URL is updated to reflect the page which is being loaded, but the page content still shows the previous page (which is what I mean by "freezes").

Ideally, it would be good if the URL should change to the new page, and the page content should show the new page too (even though the data for that page has not yet been returned). Then, as each load operation returns, the relevant part of the page should be updated when the data is bound into the view model.

Is there a recommended way for achieving this inside Durandal?

My current solution is to kick-off the load in the activate method, and then populate the data in the viewAttached method:

var loadPromise;

viewModel.activate = function () {
    // All loads return a promise
    var firstLoad = myService.loadFirstData();
    var secondLoad = myService.loadSecondData();
    var thirdLoad = myService.loadThirdDataWhichTakesAges();

    loadPromise = $.when(firstLoad, secondLoad, thirdLoad);

    // Don't return the promise - let activation proceed.
};

viewModel.viewAttached = function () {
    $.when(loadPromise).then(function (one, two, three) {
        viewModel.one(one);
        viewModel.two(two);
        viewModel.three(three);
    });
};

It seems to work, but I remember reading somewhere that relying on viewAttached wasn't a good solution. I'm also not sure if there is potential for a race condition since I'm allowing the activate to proceed.

Any other recommendations?

share|improve this question
    
In general, for my SPA applications I create a transparent div with "loading" text and gif. This div is overlayed over the complete page, so that users get a feed back that the application is trying to do something but at the same time they should not be able to click on something else or do some kind of data manipulation while my page is being navigated. You can create a common service which any view can call before its navigation starts and remove the div after the navigation ends. – Yogesh Jul 31 '13 at 15:24
    
Thanks @Yogesh, I do something similar - though I try to avoid complete page overlays because they don't perform well on mobile devices. – gerrod Aug 1 '13 at 4:33
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You don't have to return a promise but in that case you must handle this in you knockout bindings so you woun't bind to elements that are undefined. You can try to get rid of that 'return' in activate but add a property indicating if model is still loading. Something like this:

viewModel.isLoading = ko.observable(false);
viewModel.activate = function () {
   isLoading(true);
   var loadPromise = myService.loadData();

   $.when(loadPromise).then(function (loadedData) {
      viewModel.data(data);
      isLoading(false);
   });
};

And then, in your view, you can have a section that shows up when view is still loading and one that shows up when loading is done. Sometinhg like:

<div data-bind:"visible: isLoading()">Loading Data....</div>
<div data-bind:"visible: !isLoading()">Put your regular view with bindings here. Loading is done so bindings will work.</div>
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure that this will prevent the problem the bindings not applying correctly though. The visible: !isLoading() doesn't prevent child bindings from being applied (where as the if binding does because the child nodes are removed from the dom). From what I've seen, problems occur if you update your viewModel's observables between the activate call and the viewAttached call. – gerrod Aug 1 '13 at 4:39
    
On re-reading my question it appears that I wasn't being specific enough in what I was asking - I wanted to know the best way of avoiding the data-binding problems, rather than the best way of displaying to the user that a load operation was happening. So now I have a better understanding of the nature of your answer; so I'll mark it as correct! – gerrod Aug 1 '13 at 5:17
    
Great! So we do not need to return the promise to the engine. – Ashraf Sayied-Ahmad Nov 21 '14 at 15:51

Which version of Durandal are you using? In Durandal 2.0.0pre you would be allowed NOT returning a promise in activate so that the composition of the view (without data) could happen immediately.

You might consider refactoring viewModel.one etc. into a module that returns a constructor function, so that each one, two, three would be responsible for retrieving their own data. That way you first two calls wouldn't have to wait on loadThirdDataWhichTakesAges. That would make sense in scenarios where one, two, three are not heavily depend on each other.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem here though is that if one/two/three all resolve somewhere between activate and viewAttached, you end up with a race condition which breaks your bindings. Check the link I referred to in my question for an explanation of that. Thanks for your answer though! – gerrod Aug 1 '13 at 4:34

For reference; I posted a similar question on the Durandal Google Group (effectively asking if using activate and viewAttached in this manner is an OK idea) and got this reply from Rob Eisenberg:

That will probably work. The problem is that Knockout will destroy databindings on elements if the properties are updated and the element isn't currently in the document. This can happen depending on the timing of the async code. Because of the way composition worked in 1.x, this would cause problems if you didn't return the promise from your activate function. It should work better in viewAttached, but depending on the nature of your composition, the view may be attached to its parent, but still not in the document. It depends on the depth of the composition. So, you could encounter issues with this too if you have this in a deeply composed module. Unfortunately, there isn't a clean way about it in Durandal 1.x due to the knockout behavior. In Durandal 2.x we have reworked composition so that this problem is non-existent and returning the promise is no longer necessary (though you can still do it). Durandal 2.0 will be releasing in about two weeks.

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