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I want to make a simple pause function that is within a game loop that uses TaskTimer, but it's not functioning. Is there something wrong with the task timer? Should I be using another util? I've been stuck on this for a while now.

import java.awt.event.KeyEvent;
import java.awt.event.KeyListener;
import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;
import javax.swing.JFrame;

public class test extends JFrame implements KeyListener, Runnable {
    public boolean pause = false;

    public test() {
        new JFrame();
        addKeyListener(this);
        setVisible(true);
    }

@Override
public void run() {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    while (true) {
        if (pause) {
            System.out.println("Paused");
            Timer timer = new Timer();
            timer.schedule(new TimerTask() {
                public void run() {
                    System.out.println("Some Pause Related Task");
                    pause = false;
                }
            }, (long) 3000);
        }
    }
}

@Override
public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub

}

@Override
public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub

}

@Override
public void keyTyped(KeyEvent e) {
    char c = e.getKeyChar();
    if (c == KeyEvent.VK_SPACE) {
        System.out.println("typed space");
        pause = true;
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    new test();
}
}
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4 Answers 4

  1. JFrame isn't focusable JComponents, won't react to KeyEvent, then (never) KeyListener doesn't works, is required to use focusable JComponent (put there JPanel and to with setFocusable()), but not proper of possible ways

  2. Swing JComponents are designated to use KeyBindings instead of lowlevel KeyListener (with another side effect in compare with KeyBindings)

  3. use KeyListener only in the case that there are three or more Keys pressed e.i.

  4. use Swing Timer instead of util.Timer, output from Swing Timer notified EDT, otherwise you have to calculating with Concurency in Swing

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I recommend you use a swing timer instead of a utility timer. It is tailored for swing apps that need a periodic callback. The callbacks go to an ActionListener and occur in the EDT. I am also puzzled by the line new JFrame() in your constructor. It, quite frankly, is useless.

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You never call run() to start the timer. I also recommend following tbodt's advice to use swing Timers instead of the general purpose timers in swing programs.

public void main() {
    // Swing components should be modified only in the event dispatch thread.
    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            test t = new test(); // test class should really be renamed to Test to follow java naming conventions
            t.run();
        }
    });
}

Furthermore, remove the while loop. Otherwise you create new timers until you run out of memory - you need only one. The timer will take care of the repeats. Just call timer.stop() when you want to pause.

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Yeah use the correct Timmer. This one is for regular Tasks not intended to controll the main game loop. Better switch now, to avoid problems with TimerTask in later development. Why you dont like the truth? If you do not believe read the API, but you must not downvote. ;)

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