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Currently I'm unit testing the following code:

if ($(selectedElement).innerText == 'blah')
{
    // do something
}

with selectedElement being an anchor object selected from the UI.

In my test code, I have created a DOM structure which has that anchor in the proper position ready to be selected. The problem here is that since selectedElement is originally a javascript object, I need to convert the anchor I got from the DOM structure (which is a JQuery object) in order to get into the above condition.

I have tried the following, with no success:

// DOM structure using HtmlDoc
/*:DOC += <span id='testSpan' class='testSpanClass'><a href='#' id='selectedElem'>blah</a></span> */
selectedElement = $('#selectedElem')[0];

My goal is to be able to use a normal Javascript object to satisfy the condition, and also be able to switch it back to a jQuery object to satisfy conditions further down the function. But if there is a better approach I'll give it a go.

Does anyone have any ideas on how to go about this problem?

EDIT: Is there a solution that does not require changing of the code? selectedElement is actually a global variable.

Thanks.

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+1 for unit testing your code :) –  Doug Neiner Nov 25 '09 at 2:04
2  
$(selectedElement).innerText is invalid code .. $(selectedElement) is a wrapped set/array of objects .. innerText is not a property of that .. use $(selectedElement).text() –  Scott Evernden Nov 25 '09 at 3:35
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I am not sure what browser you are testing in, but innerText is an IE only property. Since you are already using jQuery, I would suggest you just call the .text() method on the selected element like this:

selectedElement = $('#selectedElem')[0]; // Get DOM element

if ($(selectedElement).text() == 'blah')
{
    // do something
}

You're method of getting the DOM object is fine: $('#selectedElem')[0] or $('#selectedElem').get(0) are equivalent, but the first one is faster in large loops.

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Unfortunately it didn't work. Also, I would avoid changing the code as selectedElement is a global variable also used somewhere else (as updated in the question). –  BeraCim Nov 25 '09 at 3:00
    
What didn't work? (I updated my code to reflect not changing the global variable). If you have a valid DOM element, $(el).text() will return the innerText so to speak. –  Doug Neiner Nov 25 '09 at 3:21
    
What if I'm not allowed to change 'innerText'? –  BeraCim Nov 25 '09 at 3:26
    
innerText is an Internet Explorer only property. It will only work in IE, other browsers have different properties. I think Firefox has textContent. Do you mean you can't change the value or you can't change the use of the property? –  Doug Neiner Nov 25 '09 at 3:38
    
I have to use the expression $(selectedElement).innerText. This is in the source code which I'm not allowed to modify. –  BeraCim Nov 25 '09 at 3:40
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jQuery's get method returns the original DOM elements for that jQuery object. I think perhaps you need to use $('#selectedElem').get(0)

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can you use jquery's .html() ?

if ($(selectedElement).html() == 'blah')
{
    // do something
}

otherwise, without changing code:

var selectedElement = $('#selectedElem')[0];

if (selectedElement.innerHTML == 'blah')
{
    // do something
}
share|improve this answer
    
.html() would not be the equivalent of .innerText. .text() would be what they would want. –  Doug Neiner Nov 25 '09 at 2:04
    
After a quick test to make sure, it seems to work either way. But I was of the understanding that .html() was for anything between html tags. –  Nick Spiers Nov 25 '09 at 2:32
    
If I can change the code, yes this works perfect. What if I cannot change the code? Are there anyway to write tests to actually get into the condition? –  BeraCim Nov 25 '09 at 3:03
    
Hey Nick, you are right, in this case they would be the same. But if there were any child elements it would be a different result. –  Doug Neiner Nov 25 '09 at 3:21
    
@BeraCim try my edit. @dcneiner Yeah, it would return everything between the anchor tags. I'm just used to innerHTML (like in my edit) working on this and not innerText which would be undefined, so I think of .html() –  Nick Spiers Nov 25 '09 at 3:25
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