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int main()
{

int *p;
p = malloc(5 * sizeof(int));
p =(int[5]) {11,12,13,14,15};

printf("[%d] [%d] [%d] [%d] [%d] \n",p[0],p[1],p[2],p[3],p[4]);
printf("[%lu] [%lu] [%lu] [%lu]\n",sizeof(&p[0]),sizeof(&p[1]),sizeof(&p[2]),sizeof(p));
printf("[%p] [%p] [%p] \n",&p[0],&p[1],p);


free(p);
return 0;

}

while running the exe i am getting the following

[11] [12] [13] [14] [15] 
[8] [8] [8] [8]
[0x7fff48ee93e0] [0x7fff48ee93e4] [0x7fff48ee93e0] 
*** glibc detected *** ./a.out: double free or corruption (out): 0x00007fff48ee93e0 ***
======= Backtrace: =========
/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6(+0x7eb96)[0x7fcce0856b96]
./a.out[0x40068a]
/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xed)[0x7fcce07f976d]
./a.out[0x4004c9]
======= Memory map: ========
00400000-00401000 r-xp 00000000 08:05 408246                             /home/user1/Desktop/c/a.out
00600000-00601000 r--p 00000000 08:05 408246                             /home/user1/Desktop/c/a.out
00601000-00602000 rw-p 00001000 08:05 408246                             /home/user1/Desktop/c/a.out
00e54000-00e75000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0                                  [heap]
7fcce05c2000-7fcce05d7000 r-xp 00000000 08:05 1314445                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
7fcce05d7000-7fcce07d6000 ---p 00015000 08:05 1314445                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
7fcce07d6000-7fcce07d7000 r--p 00014000 08:05 1314445                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
7fcce07d7000-7fcce07d8000 rw-p 00015000 08:05 1314445                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
7fcce07d8000-7fcce098d000 r-xp 00000000 08:05 1326756                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.15.so
7fcce098d000-7fcce0b8c000 ---p 001b5000 08:05 1326756                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.15.so
7fcce0b8c000-7fcce0b90000 r--p 001b4000 08:05 1326756                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.15.so
7fcce0b90000-7fcce0b92000 rw-p 001b8000 08:05 1326756                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.15.so
7fcce0b92000-7fcce0b97000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
7fcce0b97000-7fcce0bb9000 r-xp 00000000 08:05 1326744                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.15.so
7fcce0d98000-7fcce0d9b000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
7fcce0db5000-7fcce0db9000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
7fcce0db9000-7fcce0dba000 r--p 00022000 08:05 1326744                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.15.so
7fcce0dba000-7fcce0dbc000 rw-p 00023000 08:05 1326744                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.15.so
7fff48eca000-7fff48eeb000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0                          [stack]
7fff48fdb000-7fff48fdd000 r-xp 00000000 00:00 0                          [vdso]
ffffffffff600000-ffffffffff601000 r-xp 00000000 00:00 0                  [vsyscall]
Aborted (core dumped)

Some thing wrong in freeing the memory,i cannot figure out actual problem.Please help what is the real problem in freeing memory in above program

share|improve this question
1  
This is Undefined behaviour.Trying to free what is not allocated by malloc. – Dayal rai Jul 30 '13 at 9:13
    
Use valgrind and compile with gcc -Wall -g – Basile Starynkevitch Jul 30 '13 at 11:47
p = malloc(5 * sizeof(int));
p =(int[5]) {11,12,13,14,15};

You are overwriting p; your program has memory leaks.

free(p);

p no longer points to the object you allocated with malloc. free can only be called with a pointer argument to a memory object allocated with malloc.

To fix your program, remove the line:

p =(int[5]) {11,12,13,14,15};

and explicitly assign values to your array.

for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    p[i] = i + 11;
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Or even better: remove malloc() and free() and leave the p = (int[5]){ 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 }; part. – user529758 Jul 30 '13 at 9:36
    
@H2CO3 Better, it depends. I assume he was using the compound literal only to assign values to his dynamically allocated array object (which is obviously incorrect). – ouah Jul 30 '13 at 9:45
    
My observation is solely based on the fact that he never returns it from the function, and as such, dynamic memory allocation is superfluous. – user529758 Jul 30 '13 at 10:30

So as others already pointed out, overwriing p with a pointer to a compound literal then free()ing it is not good. If you, however, don't really need dynamic memory allocation (as in your case, because you use the array only within the function), then drop the call to malloc() and free() and use the compound literal only:

p = (int [5]){ 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 };

The object will have automatic storage duration.

But, if you do need the object outside of the function, then use dynamic allocation, and copy the literal into the allocated space:

p = malloc(5 * sizeof(*p));
memcpy(p, (int [5]){ 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 }, 5 * sizeof(*p));
share|improve this answer
1  
WaW!!.. interesting memcpy(p, (int [5]){ 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 }, 5 * sizeof(*p)); wonderful actually – Grijesh Chauhan Jul 30 '13 at 9:52

free(p) can be called on dynamically allocated memory to deallocate the memory explicitly whereas in your code after the assignment:

p =(int[5]) {11,12,13,14,15};

p points to a statically allocated memory, so you can't call free(p) as it is undefined behavior.

In fact you should do like otherwise you code has memory leak:

p = malloc(5 * sizeof(int));
free(p); // free dynamically allocated memory 
p =(int[5]) {11,12,13,14,15};  

after last assignment you don't need to call free on p. (Memory for this implicitly deallocated when p life ends).

After p = malloc(5 * sizeof(int));, you can assign value to dynamically allocated memory and instruction p[i] = 25; is valid operation (before call free(p)).

share|improve this answer
    
The compound literal is not read-only, and p = malloc(); free(p); is only an overly inefficient no-op. – user529758 Jul 30 '13 at 9:37
    
@H2CO3 You means p =(int[5]) {11,12,13,14,15}; then p[2] = 12 not illegal ? – Grijesh Chauhan Jul 30 '13 at 9:38
    
Yes, I mean that. – user529758 Jul 30 '13 at 9:38

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