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I searched around for this a lot, and it appears all solutions are making use of some module or the other.

I have 2 dates in yyyymmdd format. I'd like to know of a simple way to calculate the number of days between these dates, without using any modules.

Example: Date 1: 20130625 Date 2: 20130705

Number of days = 10

PS: I cannot use any modules due to restrictions on the server I will be running the script on. Perl version - 5.8.4

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5  
All the modules you would need for this does not need any compilation and can be used the same way you will upload your perl script. That is without considering the version of perl installed which may already have most of the needed modules installed by default. –  Prix Jul 30 '13 at 9:12
1  
I have edited my question with my perl version. Could you specify which module? Is this possible with Time::Local? –  JTG Jul 30 '13 at 9:36
1  
You're using an unsupported version of Perl that is over eight years old. You're also saying that you can't use CPAN - which is most of the power of Perl. I strongly suggest that you get yourself a reasonable working environment before trying to do any work :-) –  Dave Cross Jul 30 '13 at 12:14
    
The script is meant to be deployed on multiple live and extremely business-critical servers, which are pretty old and were configured by another team. Doing any sort of modifications, like adding perl libraries, means a HUGE administrative overhead of approvals - I just want to avoid all that and get the job done another way. I'm sure you can understand :-) –  JTG Jul 30 '13 at 13:07
1  
If you don't have Time::Local, you can always copy/paste its source into your script. You basically just need _daygm, which is only about 10 lines long. –  bart Jul 30 '13 at 16:26
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
sub yyyymmdd_to_rata_die {
    use integer;
    my ( $y, $m, $d ) = $_[0] =~ /\A([0-9]{4})([0-9]{2})([0-9]{2})\z/
        or return;

    my $adj;

    # make month in range 3..14 (treat Jan & Feb as months 13..14 of prev year)
    if ( $m <= 2 ) {
        $y -= ( $adj = ( 14 - $m ) / 12 );
        $m += 12 * $adj;
    }
    elsif ( $m > 14 ) {
        $y += ( $adj = ( $m - 3 ) / 12 );
        $m -= 12 * $adj;
    }

    # add: day of month, days of previous 0-11 month period that began w/March,
    # days of previous 0-399 year period that began w/March of a 400-multiple
    # year), days of any 400-year periods before that, and 306 days to adjust
    # from Mar 1, year 0-relative to Jan 1, year 1-relative (whew)

    $d += ( $m * 367 - 1094 ) / 12 + $y % 100 * 1461 / 4 + ( $y / 100 * 36524 + $y / 400 ) - 306;
}

print yyyymmdd_to_rata_die(20130705) - yyyymmdd_to_rata_die(20130625);
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I was trolling for comments on code copying, but no one bit :( –  ysth Jul 31 '13 at 2:32
    
Well, this worked for me - thanks a bunch. –  JTG Aug 7 '13 at 11:21
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Expression returns 10.

(
    Time::Piece->strptime('20130705', '%Y%m%d')
  - Time::Piece->strptime('20130625', '%Y%m%d')
)->days

Time::Piece is part of the core Perl distribution since v5.9.5.

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Should have mentioned this before, but my perl version is 5.8.4 , and it doesn't recognize this module :( –  JTG Jul 30 '13 at 9:33
    
Why are you using an out of date and unsupported version of Perl? –  Dave Cross Jul 30 '13 at 12:14
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Its simple:

1) for each date:

1.1) turn years into ydays

1.2) turn months into mdays

1.3) make sum days + mdays + ydays

2) substract that two values

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