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Let's say I can a set of statements:

try {
  String a = getProperty("a");
  String b = getProperty("b");
  String c = getProperty("c");
} catch(Exception e) {

}

Now, lets say property b was not found and the function throws an exception. In this case, how would I just continue or perhaps set b to null without having to write a try-catch block for each property? I mean, a,b,c exist but sometime they might not be found at all during which an exception is thrown.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Assuming you can't change the function so that it returns null when the property isn't found, you are kind of stuck wrapping everything in its own try catch block -- especially if you want for every value that can be retrieved to be retrieved (as opposed to letting the first value that fails cancel the whole operation.)

If you have a lot of these properties to retrieve, perhaps it would be cleaner to write a helper method to use:

String getPropertySafely(String key) {
   try {
      return getProperty(key);
   } catch (Exception e) {
      return null;
   }
}
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This looks very interesting! Thanks –  Legend Nov 25 '09 at 3:12
1  
I would name it "getPropertyQuietly" just because they use that naming convention in the Jakarta Commons IO (the methods closeQuietly in the IOUtils class) –  Ravi Wallau Nov 25 '09 at 5:07
2  
+1 Ravi - A major pet peeve of mine is swallowing exceptions. If you're going to do so, at least make it obvious based on the name of the method. (Clean Code) –  Elliot Feb 16 '10 at 2:38
    
It it better to use a try-catch or throw an error from a method? I have never been completely certain of this fact. I want to always, for the most part, handle all errors with in the class or method that has the try-catch. I do not want to have the rest of the implementing classes have to add a throws to the method stub to catch an error. –  Doug Hauf Feb 11 at 18:34
    
@Doug Hauf: It's generally a good idea to catch and handle the exception yourself in situations (like the code above) where you are in a position to either 1) recover from or 2) correctly handle the exception. In other words, callers to your method don't even need to know that the exception was thrown. You should bubble the exception up to the next level in all other situations, i.e. where the method caller might want to know that the exception occurred, and possibly handle that exception itself. –  Xanatos Feb 11 at 21:44
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You should reconsider how getProperty is handled if you plan to use many of them because there isn't a plain way to do it.

You can exploit finally statement but you still need a try-catch for every call.

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Since you are using the same function each time you might be able to put this in a loop:

String[] abc = new String[3];
String[] param = {"a", "b", "c"};
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    try {
      abc[i] = getProperty(param[i]);
    } catch(Exception e) {

    }
}

but this is rather contrived and would only be useful for a large number of properties. I suspect you will have to simple write 3 try-catch.

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You have to put a try-catch around each statement. There is no continue (like there is in ON ERROR ... RESUME blocks in VB). Instead of:

String a = null;
try {
  a = getProperty("a");
} catch(Exception e) {
  ...
}
String b = null;
try {
  b = getProperty("b");
} catch(Exception e) {
  ...
}
String c = null;
try {
  c = getProperty("c");
} catch(Exception e) {
  ...
}

you could write:

public String getPropertyNoException(String name) {
  try {
    return getProperty(name);
  } catch (Exception e) {
    return null;
  }
}

Personally I think a getProperty() is a poor candidate for throwing exceptions just for all this extra boilerplate required

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Ah... I thought I could get away using a simpler approach.. Thanks.. –  Legend Nov 25 '09 at 3:06
1  
Yeah... that getProperty comes from a different library and I didn't really want to touch that part. –  Legend Nov 25 '09 at 3:07
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