Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code for finding quartiles:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct {
    double qrt[3];
    double *value;
    int count;
} t_data;

static void set_qrt(t_data *data, int qrt)
{
    int n, e;
    double d;

    d = qrt * 0.25 * data->count + 0.5;
    n = (int)d;
    e = n != d;
    data->qrt[qrt - 1] = data->value[n - 1];
    if (e) {
        data->qrt[qrt - 1] += data->value[n];
        data->qrt[qrt - 1] *= 0.5;
    }
}

static void set_qrts(t_data *data)
{
    set_qrt(data, 2);
    if (data->count > 1) {
        set_qrt(data, 1);
        set_qrt(data, 3);
    } else {
        data->qrt[0] = 0.0;
        data->qrt[2] = 0.0;
    }
}

static int comp(const void *pa, const void *pb)
{
    const double a = *(const double *)pa;
    const double b = *(const double *)pb;

    return (a > b) ? 1 : (a < b) ? -1 : 0;
}

int main(void)
{
    double values[] = {3.7, 8.9, 7.1, 5.4, 1.2, 6.8, 4.3, 2.7};
    t_data data;

    data.value = values;
    data.count = (int)(sizeof(values) / sizeof(double));
    qsort(data.value, data.count, sizeof(double), comp);
    set_qrts(&data);
    printf("Q1 = %.1f\nQ2 = %.1f\nQ3 = %.1f\n", data.qrt[0], data.qrt[1], data.qrt[2]);
}

Is

d = qrt * 0.25 * data->count + 0.5;
n = (int)d;
e = n != d;

guaranteed to work as expected? (e == isinteger(d))

share|improve this question
1  
0.25 is a double, and 0.25f is a float, result of qrt * 0.25 * data->count + 0.5; is a double. –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 30 '13 at 10:43
    
Thank you Grijesh, I know about literals, the question was about floating representation with multiples of 0.25 –  Alter Mann Jul 30 '13 at 10:52
    
try: float qrt = .3f, count = .4f; printf(" %lu", sizeof(qrt * 0.25 * count + 0.5)); output should be == sizeof(double) –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 30 '13 at 10:55
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Numbers 0.5, 0.25, 0.125 and so on represent negative powers of two, and therefore are representable exactly in IEEE 754 types. Using these numbers does not result in representation errors.

share|improve this answer
    
Just because those numbers themselves are exact, that doesn't mean all calculations involving them will be. You still need to pay attention to the range of your values. There are no shortcuts to numerical analysis--if you want to use floats, you have to be careful. –  Lee Daniel Crocker Jul 30 '13 at 11:06
1  
@LeeDanielCrocker My answer is about negative powers of 2 in the context of the OP's specific problem. I wasn't about to cover the numerical analysis in general, as it is neither feasible in the Q&A format, nor is appropriate in response to a rather specific question. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 30 '13 at 13:42
    
I interpreted the OP's question as "will these calculations be exact"? And the right answer to that, as with all use of floating point, is "Well, it depends..." –  Lee Daniel Crocker Jul 30 '13 at 18:37
add comment

The values 0.5 and 0.25 themselves will be exact. The intermediate values of your calculation may or may not be, depending on their range. IEEE doubles have a 52-bit mantissa, so they will exactly represent to the 0.25 numbers that need 50 bits or fewer in the mantissa, which is about 15 decimal digits.

So if you add 0.25 to 100000000000000 (10^14), you'll get 100000000000000.25. But if you add 0.25 to 10000000000000000 (10^16), you'll lose the fraction.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Lee, good catch, makes me thing that the code I use looks fragile, can you suggest another way to know if result of (int * int * 0.25 + 0.5) is an integer? –  Alter Mann Jul 30 '13 at 11:16
2  
(d * d * 0.25 + 0.5) will be an integer only when d is even. When d is odd, it will be something .25 or .75. If you want the result to be exactly representable, you'll have to check that d is less than 33 million or so. I'm sure you've heard this before, but it bears repeating: if you really need things to be exact, why are you using floats? Just because your input and output to and from human beings might be floating point, that's no reason you're stuck with them internally. Use a representation that makes sense for the application. –  Lee Daniel Crocker Jul 30 '13 at 11:28
1  
@DavidRF: If you want to test if a * b * 0.25 + 0.5 is an integer, where a and b are integers, then what you are testing is that (a * b) mod 4 is equal to 2. In C that is (a * b) % 4 == 2 || (a * b) % 4 == -2, as long as a * b doesn't overflow. –  caf Jul 30 '13 at 12:09
1  
Yeah, I read "int * int" as squaring, not multiplying different numbers, but you're right in that case. Doesn't change the numerics: still have to keep them under 33 million or so. –  Lee Daniel Crocker Jul 30 '13 at 12:10
    
Thank you both, (a * b) % 4 == 2 is what I want –  Alter Mann Jul 30 '13 at 12:33
show 2 more comments

dasblinkenlight is absolutely correct. Double/float and integer types are stored differently according to IEEE754. Watch this for an easy tutorial if you are curious about it.

share|improve this answer
    
Good video!! thanks –  Alter Mann Jul 30 '13 at 10:58
    
That shouldn't be an answer, that should be a comment. –  Nikos C. Jul 30 '13 at 11:58
add comment

The double precision floating point format has 53 bits in its manitissa of which one is implicit. This means that it can represent all positive and negative integers in the range 2^0 to 2^53-1.

0 (zero) is a special case which has its own format.

When it comes to a 0.25 spacing the range is straight-forwardly calculated to be 2^-2 to 2^51-0.25. This means that quite a few but by no means all multiples of 0.25 are exactly representable in the double precision format, just as a quite a few but not all integers are exactly representable.

So if you have an exactly representable spacing of 2^x the representable range is 2^x to 2^(53+x)-2^x.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.