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I'm working on an optimization algorithm and need to store some of the data (generated by the algorithm) in a 2-dimensional array called matrix, where row(i) contains the fitness score and parameter values of optimization vector(i).

Dim matrix(vectorCount() - 1, parameterCount()) As Double
Dim params(parameterCount() - 1) As Double

For i As Integer = 0 To vectorCount() - 1
    matrix(i, 0) = vectorScore(i)
    params = vectorValues(i)
    For j As Integer = 0 To params.Length - 1
        matrix(i, j+1) = params(j)
    Next
Next

int vectorCount() returns the number of vectors.
int parameterCount() returns the number of parameters in each vector.
double vectorScore(int vectorIndex) returns the fitness score of a specified vector.
double[] vectorValues(int vectorIndex) returns the parameter values of a specified vector.

My question:
Is there a faster (i.e. more efficient) way to insert params into matrix?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want efficiency, relying on "plain" arrays is undoubtedly the best option. The reason why they are so efficient with respect to other alternatives (Collections, List, etc.) is because they contain the minimum amount of information required. If you want fancy functions allowing to sort the information easily/quickly or write complex queries to retrieve data, you shouldn't rely on arrays.

I always rely on a code like the one you wrote and haven't ever had a speed problem (this is really fast). I have done a quick research to make sure that there is no other option, but couldn't find any. The closest thing you have is Array.Copy, although it works just when the arrays have the same dimensions (I, personally, use it just with 1D arrays). In any case, I found an interesting link about Array.Copy() vs. loop performance for 2D arrays (it is in C# but everything is applicable to VB.NET).

Summary: your code is really fast and does not need to be improved. In case of having a valid alternative (Array.Copy working for 2D and 1D, what does not exist), the resulting performance would be just a bit better (and only for small array sizes).

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+1 great answer! In my case loop `ìcould easily have up to 10-20 million iterations and loop j``up to 12-15 iterations, which makes a total of at least 120 millions iterations. Is my code even with these numbers a good choice? –  bluebox Jul 30 '13 at 12:07
    
@bluebox thanks. I guess that your answer is also worthy to be known (people too worry about easy coding and inefficient storage alternatives lately) -> +1 to it right away. –  varocarbas Jul 30 '13 at 12:14
1  
@bluebox actually with these numbers, your code is the only acceptable solution (even in the irrealistic case of having a working Array.Copy). As you can see in the provided link, the bigger the array size (= the bigger the number of iterations), the better is the loop performance. –  varocarbas Jul 30 '13 at 12:23
    
@bluebox I guess that you know that creating too big arrays is not a good idea (at all); so I understand that you are accounting for different arrays or performing the iterations at different moments, but that you are not putting all these records in the same array. –  varocarbas Jul 30 '13 at 12:26
1  
@bluebox no problem. Try to use 1D arrays as much as possible and when moving to 2D intend to maintain the first dimension below 1000. It would depend upon the number of arrays and the memory of the given computer; this is an in-the-safest side recommendation. You are the one who has to do performance tests and draw the actual limits under the expected conditions. But this is a completely different story; my answer for your question is clear: is this the best way? Yes. :) –  varocarbas Jul 30 '13 at 12:42

If you want to use more than one thread, you can use a parrallel for loop.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd460713.aspx

Dim matrix(vectorCount() - 1, parameterCount()) As Double
Dim params(parameterCount() - 1) As Double

Parallel.For(0, vectorCount() - 1, Sub(i)
                                      matrix(i, 0) = vectorScore(i)
                                      params = vectorValues(i)
                                      For j As Integer = 0 To params.Length - 1
                                          matrix(i, j+1) = params(j)
                                      Next
                                   End Sub)
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+1 That's a great solution, Ceres. Thanks! –  bluebox Jul 30 '13 at 13:09

It depends a lot on the size of the array, for loop is very efficient but with very large array you can see improvement with array.copy or buffer.blockcopy.

Sub Main()

    Const ARR_SIZE_X As Integer = 9999999
    Const ARR_SIZE_y As Integer = 5
    Const DBL_SIZE As Integer = 8

    Dim watch As New Stopwatch

    Dim a1(ARR_SIZE_X) As Double
    Dim a2(ARR_SIZE_y, ARR_SIZE_X) As Double

    For x = 0 To ARR_SIZE_X
        a1(ARR_SIZE_X) = x
    Next

    watch.Start()

    For t = 0 To 10
        For y = 0 To ARR_SIZE_y
            For x = 0 To ARR_SIZE_X
                a2(y, x) = a1(x)
            Next
        Next
    Next

    watch.Stop()
    Console.WriteLine(watch.ElapsedTicks)

    watch.Reset()

    watch.Start()

    For t = 0 To 10
        For y = 0 To ARR_SIZE_y
            System.Buffer.BlockCopy(a1, 0, a2, (ARR_SIZE_X + 1) * DBL_SIZE * y, DBL_SIZE * ARR_SIZE_X)
        Next
    Next

    watch.Stop()
    Console.WriteLine(watch.ElapsedTicks)

    'For y = 0 To 4
    '    For x = 0 To 4
    '        Console.Write(a2(y, x))
    '    Next

    '    Console.WriteLine()
    'Next

    Console.ReadLine()

End Sub
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