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Can I create vector that contains elements that are noncopyable and don't have a default constructor in C++11?

example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

struct value {
    value() = delete;
    ~value() = default;

    value(value const&) = delete;
    value& operator =(value const&) = delete;

    explicit value(int i) : i_(i) {}
private:
    int i_;
};

int main() {
    std::vector<value> v;
    v.reserve(10);
    for (unsigned i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
        v.emplace_back(7);
}

and here I want to create 10 values and each to value ctor pass the integer 7 ...

std::vector< value > v(in-place, 10, 7)

Why wasn't the C++11 placement construction form added to this std::vector constructor

Errors pasted from coliru:

+ g++ -std=c++11 -O2 -Wall -pedantic -pthread main.cpp
In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.8/vector:62:0,
                 from main.cpp:3:
/usr/include/c++/4.8/bits/stl_construct.h: In instantiation of ‘void std::_Construct(_T1*, _Args&& ...) [with _T1 = value; _Args = {value}]’:
/usr/include/c++/4.8/bits/stl_uninitialized.h:75:53:   required from ‘static _ForwardIterator std::__uninitialized_copy<_TrivialValueTypes>::__uninit_copy(_InputIterator, _InputIterator, _ForwardIterator) [with _InputIterator = std::move_iterator<value*> _ForwardIterator = value*; bool _TrivialValueTypes = false]’
/usr/include/c++/4.8/bits/stl_uninitialized.h:117:41:   required from ‘_ForwardIterator std::uninitialized_copy(_InputIterator, _InputIterator, _ForwardIterator) [with _InputIterator = std::move_iterator<value*> _ForwardIterator = value*]’
/usr/include/c++/4.8/bits/stl_uninitialized.h:258:63:   required from ‘_ForwardIterator std::__uninitialized_copy_a(_InputIterator, _InputIterator, _ForwardIterator, std::allocator<_Tp>&) [with _InputIterator = std::move_iterator<value*> _ForwardIterator = value*; _Tp = value]’
/usr/include/c++/4.8/bits/stl_vector.h:1142:29:   required from ‘std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::pointer std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::_M_allocate_and_copy(std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::size_type, _ForwardIterator, _ForwardIterator) [with _ForwardIterator = std::move_iterator<value*> _Tp = value; _Alloc = std::allocator<value> std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::pointer = value*; std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::size_type = long unsigned int]’
/usr/include/c++/4.8/bits/vector.tcc:75:70:   required from ‘void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::reserve(std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::size_type) [with _Tp = value; _Alloc = std::allocator<value> std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::size_type = long unsigned int]’
main.cpp:24:17:   required from here
/usr/include/c++/4.8/bits/stl_construct.h:75:7: error: use of deleted function ‘value::value(const value&)’
     { ::new(static_cast<void*>(__p)) _T1(std::forward<_Args>(__args)...); }
       ^
main.cpp:11:5: error: declared here
     value(value const&) = delete;
     ^
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4 Answers 4

The reason you get errors is that using emplace_back on a std::vector requires the element type to be at least MoveConstructible. This is needed if the vector needs to grow and reallocate its elements.

Add a move constructor to you struct and you will be able to use it in your code (the default implementation will suffice for your code).

value(value&&) = default;

The compiler will not implicitly generate a default move constructor for your struct as you have declared your own copy constructor, value(value const&) = delete (=delete and =default count as user-declared), as well as a copy assignment operator and a destructor.

For more info about the rules of implicit move constructor generation, look here: Why no default move-assignment/move-constructor?


Using std::vector's constructor of the form std::vector(size_t count, const T& value) copies the values into the vector, and requires the element type to be CopyConstructible.

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1  
Declaring a constructor does not in general suppress generation of the default move constructor: declaring a copy constructor does suppress generation of a default move constructor (§12.8p9). –  Casey Jul 30 '13 at 16:26
    
@Casey You're correct. I've updated my answer. –  Snps Jul 30 '13 at 16:41

Yes, the resizing etc. can all be handled with move instead of copy constructor/assignment, if you define it (whatever cppreference says).

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

struct value {
    int i_;

    explicit value(int i) : i_(i)   {std::cout<<"value::value("  <<i_<<")\n"; }
    value(value &&src) : i_(src.i_) {std::cout<<"value::value(&&"<<i_<<")\n"; }
    value(value const&) = delete;
    value& operator=(value const&) = delete;
    value& operator=(value &&src) {
        i_ = src.i_;
        std::cout << "value::=(&&" << i_ << ")\n";
        return *this;
    }
    value() = delete;
};

int main() {
    std::vector<value> v;
    v.reserve(1);
    v.emplace_back(1);
    v.emplace_back(2);
    v.emplace_back(3);
}

works fine:

value::value(1)   <-- emplace_back(1)
value::value(2) 
value::value(&&1) <-- emplace_back(2) inc. resize & move 1
value::value(3)
value::value(&&1)
value::value(&&2) <-- emplace_back(3) inc. resize & move 1,2

Motivation for the requirement

Before move support, if a vector's elements were non-copyable, it would be unable to resize itself (or erase items, or fulfill quite a lot of its interface).

share|improve this answer
    
std::array is only static size, if I need dynamic size I can't use it. –  Khurshid Normuradov Jul 30 '13 at 12:37
    
I missed that you hadn't defined move constructor & assignment, given you're asking about C++11. That's all you need. –  Useless Jul 30 '13 at 13:12
    
for emplace_back needn't move ctor and assigment, if enough memory already exists, so why I should defined them? –  Khurshid Normuradov Jul 31 '13 at 5:16
    
if the vector has to resize dynamically, it needs to move your already-emplaced items to a new allocated block. –  Useless Jul 31 '13 at 7:20
    
Note that even if the move code is never called, it still needs to be instantiated. Even if the compiler is smart enough to analyze your run-time constraint at compile time, and optimize that code out, it still needs to be legally instantiatable. –  Useless Aug 2 '13 at 12:17

Yes, you can put objects that aren't copyable or default-constructible in a vector in C++11, if they are movable:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

struct value {
    value() = delete;
    ~value() = default;

    value(value const&) = delete;
    value& operator =(value const&) = delete;

    // Move construction and assignment
    value(value&&) = default;
    value& operator =(value&&) = default;

    explicit value(int i) : i_(i) {}
private:
    int i_;
};

int main() {
    std::vector<value> v;
    v.reserve(10);
    for (unsigned i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
        v.emplace_back(7);
}

But you can't use the constructor that fills such a vector with copies of a given value - since the values are not copyable. Similarly, you can't grow a vector of such objects with resize.

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Write a move constructor and then use emplace_back:

struct value
{
    ...

    value(value && obj) : i_(obj.i_)
    {
    }

    or 

    value(value && obj) = default;

    ...
};

std::vector<value> v;

for (int i=0; i<10; i++)
   v.emplace_back(7);
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