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I'm wondering where a switch statement of this style should be changed to an if else statement.

switch (foo) // foo is an enumerated type
{
    case barOne:
        if (blahOne)
        {
            DoFunction(//parameters specific to barOne);
            break;
        }
   case barTwo:
        if (blahTwo)
        {
            DoFunction(//parameters specific to barTwo);
            break;
        }
   //etc.
   default:
       // Whatever happens if none of the case's conditionals are met
}

Basically fall through is happening unless a condition is met for one of the cases. The cases are very similar, differing only in what needs to be checked for and what needs to be passed, which is why I used a switch statement.

Would it be better to use if else if? Otherwise, is it clear enough to stay, but unclear enough to warrant a comment about the fallthrough? Polymorphism is also always an option, but it seems like overkill to me.

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1  
this you can write ternary –  Nick Rosencrantz Nov 25 '09 at 4:49
    
I generally avoid ternary except for the most simple expressions because of how ugly it is. –  Anonymous Nov 25 '09 at 4:51
2  
note the //etc after the two choices –  yodie Nov 25 '09 at 4:55
1  
did you intend to put the break's outside the if clauses? Right now, if foo == barOne, the execution falls through if blahOne == false. –  rlbond Nov 25 '09 at 5:31
    
Polymorphism shouldn't seem like overkill, it's a language feature. –  GManNickG Nov 25 '09 at 5:32

10 Answers 10

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It seems like this might do strange things in some cases. What if foo == bar1, and blahOne is false, but blahTwo is true? Then you'll fall through and call the function under the foo == bar2 case, even though foo doesn't equal bar2.

That might be unexpected in practice, but if it ever did occur it might be tough to debug. I'd vote for an if else in this case, because the flow is simpler.

if (foo == barOne && blahOne)
{
    DoFunction(/*parameters specific to barOne*/);
}
else if (foo == barTwo && blahTwo)
{
    DoFunction(/*parameters specific to barTwo*/);
}
else
{
    // Handle the fallthrough case.
}

Of course, if the intention is that blahTwo can be evaluated even though foo != barTwo, then the switch might be the best way to do it, but I'd definitely be in favor of some explanatory comments in that case.

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This answer made me realize the bug in the code, and in my logic. Subtle bug to detect (at least for me), so thanks for the response. –  Anonymous Nov 25 '09 at 5:44
    
This is definitely the way to go. –  Andrew Medico Nov 25 '09 at 5:47

Your code is definitely smelly as posted because the flow of control can contradict the comments as follows;

If foo is barOne and blahOne is false and blahTwo is true then DoFunction() is called with parameters specific to barTwo. But foo is barOne not barTwo.

Maybe what you really meant was the following, no fall throughs and no smells in my opinion.

switch (foo) // foo is an enumerated type
{
    case barOne:
        if (blahOne)
            DoFunction(//parameters specific to barOne);
        break;
   case barTwo:
        if (blahTwo)
            DoFunction(//parameters specific to barTwo);
        break;
   //etc.
   default:
       // Whatever happens if none of the case's conditionals are met
}
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No that isn't what I want. The breaks are meant to be inside the clauses. I described the reasoning in a comment above. –  Anonymous Nov 25 '09 at 5:40
    
Puzzling. Your accepted answer does exactly the same thing as my answer, with if else instead of a switch. The bug described in your accepted answer is exactly the bug I describe in my answer. The bug is that the breaks are inside the clauses, causing unhelpful fallthroughs, even if your intention is to have them there. If/else or switch comes down to a matter of stylistic preference. As others have said, I'd recommend switch if you have 3 or more clauses. –  Bill Forster Nov 25 '09 at 5:54
    
No they don't do the same thing. Using a switch like you did causes the switch clause to break once a case is met (thus the default is never reached) and regardless of whether the conditional inside the case is true or false. This is obviously why the OP used the method he/she used. Using an else if and testing both conditions in the parentheses (barOne && blahOne) allows you to reach the 'else' if barOne is true but blahOne is false. Your switch clause does not. As a side note, don't get mad over whether someone picks your answer or not. –  trikker Nov 25 '09 at 16:11
    
Good point, I hadn't noticed that the default handling is different in the two cases, and better in the if else case. I wasn't mad, far from it, just puzzled. Getting mad for not being accepted in Stackoverflow world would be a recipe for premature and unnecessary insanity. If you look at my accepted answers you will find one case where I clearly got it totally wrong, admitted as much, and was still accepted despite my protests! –  Bill Forster Nov 25 '09 at 20:34

Seems like it would make more sense to compute the parameters within if/else or switch logic, store them in variables, and then call the function afterwords with whatever parameters you computed.

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I would prefer a set of if/else-if statements, but after heavy development and growth, both the switch and the if/else-if will start to rot. Imagine what would happen if the number of types defined in the foo enum grew large; both the switch and if/else-if strategy will not look pretty.

At some point, you will need to either abstract the DoSomething function (think Strategy pattern) or abstract the parameters to the DoSomething function (put the foo enum in DoSomething's prototype or make the parameter to DoSomething be a sibling type to a base class).

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If I were you I would do:

if (foo == barOne && blahOne) {
  DoFunction(/* params specific to barOne */);
} else if (foo == barTwo && blahTwo) {
  DoFunction(/* params specific to barTwo */);
} else {
  DoDefaultStuff();
}

That seems a lot more readable to me. You have too much extra logic to warrant a simple switch/case. Also, if you have what essentially amounts to an if nested in an if (and that's pretty much it)... you should consider using &&

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That was my instinct, but this makes it harder to zone into the correct choice when reading the code if you want to edit something. In other words, barOne and barTwo don't stand out as clearly. –  yodie Nov 25 '09 at 5:10

Wow, I'm not sure whether I would call that a "code smell" or just a plain bug. I look at that code and immediately think, "that can't be right".

Switch case fall-through should always be clearly documented in a code comment, with justification if it's obscure.

I was disappointed 15 years ago when Java came out and I saw that they hadn't fixed the default-fallthrough behaviour of C's switch statement. However, Go has fixed it, with an explicit fallthrough statement required if that's what you want:

In a case or default clause, the last statement only may be a "fallthrough" statement (§Fallthrough statement) to indicate that control should flow from the end of this clause to the first statement of the next clause. Otherwise control flows to the end of the "switch" statement.

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I actually quite like it the way it is now; the switch is acting as a short circuit to skip the evaluation of blahOne etc based on the enum value. The only thing I'd suggest is a comment at the end of each case noting the fall-through, as that's often missed on a casual glance. And probably one at the top saying why it's like this.

I'm assuming, of course, that this is in fact the intended behaviour; if it's not, then as others have said, it might be just plain wrong.

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Considering the &&s, wouldn't it skip the evaluation of the blahs anyway? –  yodie Nov 25 '09 at 12:36
    
I was thinking of about it as an optimisation of just if (blahOne) ... else if (blahTwo) ... etc with the earlier ones skippable in certain states; in a tight loop with lots of branches this could be a neat optimisation. But I think the OP's comment on the accepted answer indicates this wasn't the desired behaviour anyway. –  Kieron Nov 26 '09 at 3:42

It seem the switch is more readable than if/else if, especially when there are more options. Rule of thumb: If you have to do more than three comparisons against the same data then use switch.

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I don't really see a code smell here. The code snippet is very readable. Depending on what blahOne and blahTwo represent and what the code does, you might also be able to enhance readability by baking them into the first enum. So instead of two cases with one if statement each, you get four cases.

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Always fancy if/else K&R referenced so avoid switch to a. enable more advanced test and b. avoid forgetting default and c. improve readability

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I'd have to disagree with c) simply because most consider switch more readable than else if. With b), I don't think you should stop yourself from using a construct just because you forget how to use it or absent mindedly forget writing a part of it (similar to 0 == foo rather than foo == 0). With a), that doesn't apply here. –  Anonymous Nov 25 '09 at 4:57
    
source: "There are several main schools of thought about the switch statement's semantics: School I wants to define the switch statement in term of an equivalent if/elif chain" –  Nick Rosencrantz Nov 25 '09 at 5:12

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