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In my application I have a page which lists some data grouped by categories.

Each item on the list can have subitems.

So I'd it to look like this:

  1. List item

    1.1 List item

    1.2 List item

  2. List item

    2.1 List item

    2.2 List item

I can achieve this easily using this three lines of css code:

OL { counter-reset: item }
LI { display: block }
LI:before { content: counters(item, ".") " "; counter-increment: item }

However on this page I have tabs for each category, which contains such nested list of items and I want to make index of first item of next tab to be x+1-th item, where x is number of last item from previous tab ( category ).

#tab 1
 1. List item

   1.1 List item

   1.2 List item
 2. List item

   2.1 List item

   2.2 List item

#tab 2
 3. List item

   3.1 List item

   3.2 List item
 4. List item

   4.1 List item

   4.2 List item

So I need functionality to provide starting index to <ol> tag. I found out that there is attribute start="x", however it doesn't work with these 3 lines of css code for nested lists.

Any idea how to do something like this?

share|improve this question
    
what doctype are you using? – Lorenzo Marcon Jul 30 '13 at 13:28
    
Can you either recreate this on jsfiddle or show us your HTML? – kalley Jul 30 '13 at 13:31
    
Marcon: I am using !DOCTYPE html. kalley: I want to achieve something like this jsfiddle.net/qGCUk/4 , but I want to be able to set startpoints for outerloops on each tab. – koleS Jul 30 '13 at 13:34

Just remove the css, and correctly close and reopen <ol> tags.

If you need to split the list in two separate tabs, you have to close the first <ol> inside the first tab. Then, reopen the new list with the start parameter inside the second tab: <ol start="3">.

Working fiddle - (I set start="5" to show it's working; for your purposes, just set it to 3 or what you need)

UPDATE:

Keep the CSS, and wrap all the tabs in the main <ol> and </ol>, so the counter doesn't reset.

http://jsfiddle.net/qGCUk/227/

share|improve this answer
    
This won't work for the problem here. The problem seems to be that koleS wants to use the counters feature to make special ordered list labels, which makes things a tad more complicated. – Ryan Jul 30 '13 at 14:20
    
In your example I can nest start attribute, however it doesn't give me what I want to achieve, which is format X.Y, it only gives me single number as label. – koleS Jul 30 '13 at 14:23
    
You're right, I'm looking for a more detailed solution – Lorenzo Marcon Jul 30 '13 at 14:25
    
@koleS, take a look at my updated answer and fiddle, is this what you need? – Lorenzo Marcon Jul 30 '13 at 14:48

From http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-lists/#html4:

/* The start attribute on ol elements */
ol[start] { 
    counter-reset: list-item attr(start, integer, 1); 
    counter-increment: list-item -1; 
}

Adding this to the CSS allowed the start attribute to be recognized in my tests.

EDIT: Instead of using the start attribute, you can use CSS classes for each new starting point. The downside is that this will require more maintenance should you need to change anything.

CSS:

ol.start4
{
    counter-reset: item 4;
    counter-increment: item -1;
}

ol.start6
{
    counter-reset: item 6;
    counter-increment: item -1;
}

HTML:

<div>
<ol>
<li>Item 1</li>
<li>Item 2
    <ol>
    <li>Item 1</li>
    <li>Item 2</li>
    </ol></li>
<li>Item 3
    <ol>
    <li>Item 1</li>
    <li>Item 2</li>
    </ol></li>
</ol>
</div>

<div>
<ol class="start4">
<li>Item 4
    <ol>
    <li>Item 1</li>
    <li>Item 2</li>
    </ol></li>
<li>Item 5</li>
</ol>
</div>

<div>
<ol class="start6">
<li>Item 6</li>
<li>Item 7
    <ol>
    <li>Item 1</li>
    <li>Item 2</li>
    </ol></li>
</ol>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
I tried your code on jsfiddle and it gives the same output with and without that CSS code. Remember I dont' want subquestions to start always from 1, but to be X.1, X.2 , where X is the number of parent question. – koleS Jul 30 '13 at 14:19
    
Of course, when I went back and added surrounding divs to simulate tabs, it failed. Yeah, I know you don't want to start from 1. The 1 in there is a fallback from the example in case the attr call fails. You can actually omit that part, not that it will help immediately for this case. – Ryan Jul 30 '13 at 14:21
    
I think the problem is that CSS attr() only works in certain situations and not in others. For example, it works in the "content" CSS property, but not in "counter-reset". I have a new solution, but I think it's a bit ugly. – Ryan Jul 30 '13 at 14:46

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