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I'm looking to add a log statement for every WinForms button click that the user clicks, and ideally, an indentifier of the parent form (such as the title bar). I have seen posts logging all mouse clicks, but i'm interested in just logging button clicks. I have read the accepted answer here and adapted it:

    public class ButtonLogger
    {
        private static readonly ILog Logger = LogManager.GetLogger(typeof(ButtonLogger));

        public static void AttachButtonLogging(Control.ControlCollection controls)
        {
            foreach (var button in controls.OfType<Button>())
            {
                button.Click += LogButtonClick;
            }
        }

        private static void LogButtonClick(object sender, EventArgs eventArgs)
        {

            Button button = sender as Button;
            Logger.InfoFormat("Button clicked: {0} ({1})", button.Text, button.Parent.Text);
        }
    }

This class is used at the end of a constructor in a form, e.g. :

ButtonLogger.AttachButtonLogging(this.Controls);

The problem I'm facing with this is that the Controls property doesn't seem to have a reference to my buttons. Presumably this is because the buttons aren't added directly to the form, but rather, another control that is in the Controls property. However, the Controls property only contains a single control, a ToolStrip.

Is there a way I can harness all of the buttons on a form, regardless of their parent container? My final goal is to add a log statement to my buttons, so if this can be accomplished some other way besides button click event methods, then I'm open to that as well

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe you need to search for buttons recursively:

public static void AttachButtonLogging(Control.ControlCollection controls)
{
    foreach (var control in controls.Cast<Control>())
    {
        if (control is Button)
        {
           Button button = (Button)control;
           button.Click += LogButtonClick;
        }
        else
        {
            AttachButtonLogging(control.Controls);
        }
    }
}
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2  
There is a situation in which we have a TabControl and some Buttons on some TabPage, we have to look in the TabControl.TabPages. I've experienced this problem, however if that's not the case of the OP, this code works OK. –  King King Jul 30 '13 at 14:20
    
@KingKing thanks, very good note. Frankly speaking I thought that tab pages will present in Controls of TabControl. Weird design! –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jul 30 '13 at 14:22
    
Is this known to cause any performance issues when constructing the form? While this is recursion, it should be pretty light since there's a small amount of controls on a particular form (20 at most maybe). Also, since these are attached after the "real" event is attached to the button, it shouldn't delay the real processing you want to happen when the button is clicked. –  Stealth Rabbi Jul 30 '13 at 14:23
    
@StealthRabbi I don't think it will cause some notable delay. I think some improvements can be done here (i.e. avoid controls collection initialization for each control), but you should try it - maybe all is OK as is –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jul 30 '13 at 14:28
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One thing you could consider is to create a subclass of the standard Button class, and let the buttons themselves do the logging. Of course, you'd have to go around and substitute all the buttons in the application for your own implementation, but it should be possible to do that with a global search+replace.

Here's an example implementation:

public class LoggerButton : Button
{
    private static readonly ILog Logger = LogManager.GetLogger(typeof(LoggerButton));

    protected override void OnClick(EventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnClick(e);
        Logger.InfoFormat("Button clicked: {0} ({1})", this.Text, this.Parent.Text);
    }
}
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That makes things more challenging for the designer, too. You'd have to create a custom toolbox pallete and use the custom button class instead of the built in one. It's an option for sure though, but perhaps a bit of a misuse of inheritance. –  Stealth Rabbi Jul 30 '13 at 14:38
    
@StealthRabbi Really? I've never needed to do anything special for my custom controls to show up in the Visual Studio toolbox. But yeah, I'll agree that it's somewhat hacky. –  Magnus Grindal Bakken Jul 30 '13 at 14:40
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