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Can someone help me find out what I am doing wrong on this bash script. I am trying to using if statement inside case statement and bash is complaining syntax error.

findinfo() {
OPT1=$1
case  "$OPT1" in
   linux)
        echo "Setting environment"
        ESC="hello_linux" if [[ "$PROJN" == "ONE" ||  "$PROJN" == "two" ]]
        ;;
   Windows)
        echo "Setting environment"
        ESC="hello_windows" if [[ "$PROJN" == "ONE" ||  "$PROJN" == "two" ]]
        ;;
   Android)
        echo "Setting environment"
        ESC="hello_android" if [[ "$PROJN" == "ONE" ||  "$PROJN" == "two" ]]
        ;;
esac

}

Thanks

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3  
It has nothing to do with the case. –  Keith Thompson Jul 30 '13 at 14:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In bash, if must precede the then part:

if [[ "$PROJN" == "ONE" ||  "$PROJN" == "two" ]] ; then ESC=hello_linux ; fi

The "postfix" if is possible in Perl (and maybe somewhere else, too), but not in bash.

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Thanks for a quick solution, it worked –  user2367078 Jul 30 '13 at 14:40
2  
Needs to be ESC=hello_linux, not ESC = hello_linux; the whitespace makes this a command ESC with two arguments, = and hello_linux. –  Charles Duffy Jul 30 '13 at 14:43

The following syntax is a terser alternative:

[[ $PROJN = ONE || $PROJN = TWO ]] && ESC=hello_linux

...and the following is still shorter, and compliant with older shells:

case $PROJN in ONE|TWO) ESC=hello_linux ;; esac
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+1 but do you really need to quote here. –  devnull Jul 30 '13 at 17:10
    
@devnull No, I really don't. Better to quote when it isn't needed than not to quote when it is needed, though. –  Charles Duffy Jul 30 '13 at 17:16

There's no problem using an if inside a case statement. It's that your if statements are a wee bit incorrect.

You had your if statement on the same line as your $ESC assignment. Doesn't work outside of a case doesn't work inside. Also, you need to use -o for the or in your if statements, and you need AT LEAST one line to execute if your if statement is true. (I just put an echo as a place holder).

It could be that this particular if statement should be outside of your case. I notice that they're all the same. No need to duplicate code in that case, just put your if after the esac.

By the way: You can do an or inside of an if in either one of these two ways:

if [[ "$PROJN" == "ONE" -o  "$PROJN" == "two" ]]

or

if [[ "$PROJN" == "ONE" ]] || [[  "$PROJN" == "two" ]]

And now back your regularly scheduled program...

findinfo() {
    OPT1=$1
    case  "$OPT1" in
       linux)
            echo "Setting environment"
            ESC="hello_linux" 
            if [[ "$PROJN" == "ONE" -o  "$PROJN" == "two" ]]
            then
                 echo "Here be dragons..."
            fi
            ;;
       Windows)
            echo "Setting environment"
            ESC="hello_windows" 
            if [[ "$PROJN" == "ONE" -o  "$PROJN" == "two" ]]
            then
                 echo "Here be dragons..."
            fi
            ;;
       Android)
            echo "Setting environment"
            ESC="hello_android" 
            if [[ "$PROJN" == "ONE" -o "$PROJN" == "two" ]]
            then
                 echo "Here be dragons..."
            fi
            ;;
    esac
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Use of -o inside of [[ ]] is wrong; it should be the || operator. –  Charles Duffy Jul 30 '13 at 17:19
    
To expand on Charles' comment, -o is also deprecated inside [ ]. In that case, you would use [ ] || [ ] instead (two separate test commands). –  chepner Jul 30 '13 at 17:25

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