Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a NSPredicate to use searching Core Data:

NSPredicate *predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"objID == %@ AND createDate >= %@ AND createDate <= %@",self.objID, self.fromDate, self.toDate];

I want to expand this predicate to include the date range or if the "createDate" is nil. I'm not that familiar with SQL type searches.

Basiclly, I want to find all Core Data entities with objID and within the date range or nil.

if (objID == X && ((dateRange >= fromDate && dateRange <= toDate) || dateRange == nil))

How can I do it?

share|improve this question
    
Did you try translating that into a predicate? – Wain Jul 30 '13 at 14:35
up vote 1 down vote accepted
NSPredicate *predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"objID == %@ AND (createDate >= %@ AND createDate <= %@ OR createDate = nil)",self.objID, self.fromDate, self.toDate];

I've just added OR createDate = nil.

Check this answer. Christopher Pickslay said, you can use "nil" or "NULL", but not "NIL".

share|improve this answer
    
I don't need to worry about group them like in a If stmt? – Log139 Jul 30 '13 at 14:42
1  
@Log139, NSPredicate groups statements according to algebra of logic. A AND B OR C equals (A AND B) OR C – Valentin Shamardin Jul 30 '13 at 14:45
    
@Log139, sorry, I didn't mark brackets. I'll edit my post – Valentin Shamardin Jul 30 '13 at 14:48
    
Ok, so is this predicate grouping like (objID = X AND createDate >= X AND createDate <= X) OR createDate = nil? – Log139 Jul 30 '13 at 14:49
    
@Log139, Yes, it is. Is it ok for you? If not, just add brackets in predicate's body – Valentin Shamardin Jul 30 '13 at 14:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.