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I am using the follow code to get json object and bind it to the $scope

WORKING CODE:

$http({
    url: '/Home/GetJson',
    method: "GET",
    params: {
        clientID: cId
    }
}).success(function (data) {
    $scope.members = data.members;
})

It works .. what I would like to do is get the results into a var data then add it to the $scope.

FAILING CODE :

var data = $http({
    url: '/Home/GetJson',
    method: "GET",
    params: {
        clientID: cId
    }
}).success(function (data) {
    return data.members;
})

$scope.members = data;

When I look at $scope.members, it is empty in the failing code because $scope.members is empty when it is filled (js is event based).

How can I wait till json returns > then var = data > then $scope.members = data ?

WORKING CODE

I used Javascript callback functions as below

Call my main function

DoLogin($scope, $http, email, password, AssingMemberToScope);


function DoLogin($scope, $http, email, password, callback) {
$http({
    url: '/Home/GetJson',
    method: "GET",
    params: {
        clientID: cId
    }
}).success(function (data) {
    callback($scope, data);   //<----- Call Back occurs
})
}

//--Call-back Function working and code is separated --/

function AssingMemberToScope($scope, data) {
    if (data.msg) {
        $('.loading').hide();
        $scope.member = data.member;
    } else {
        $('.loading').hide();
        $('#msg').show();
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
You're doing it correctly in the first sample by assigning it in the callback, why change it? –  tymeJV Jul 30 '13 at 15:01
    
I wanted to place the entire json call in a separate function and return the data into the function so I can do some stuff to it. –  David K Egghead Jul 30 '13 at 15:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think a better approach would be to put the JSON call into a function that accepts a callback function as a parameter. Quick example:

function makeJSONCall(callback) {
    $http({
        url: '/Home/GetJson',
        method: "GET",
        params: { clientID: cId }
    }).success(function (data) {
        callback(data);
    });
}

function someFunctionCallback(param) {
    console.log(param) 
}

Now, inside that callback function, do what you want with the data. You can also call the JSON function when you need it now, a simple makeJSONCall(someFunctionCallback) will do.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this answer. Promises are very cool but add complexity. This represents a much more straightforward approach that will probably work in most situations. –  Joel Anair Jul 30 '13 at 15:19
    
@tymeJV - Update post with working code .. thanks! –  David K Egghead Aug 8 '13 at 22:17

Try this pattern:

angular.module('App').factory('service', function ($http) {
    var service = {
        myFunction: function (query) {
            var promise = $http({
                url: '/Home/GetJson',
                method: "GET",
                params: {
                    clientID: cId
                }
            }).success(function (data) {
                return data.members;
            });
            return promise;
        };
    }
});

Then when consume the service, do

service.myFunction(query).then(function (data) {
    $scope.members = data.members;
});
share|improve this answer
    
Nice approach, +1 –  tymeJV Jul 30 '13 at 15:18
    
@zsong what does the success method do here? It does not return data.members to the consumer(since well you have to write data.members again) –  Todilo Jan 16 at 14:43

You actually explained it yourself in your last sentence, you can use promises and their then() callback

var data = $http({
 url: '/Home/GetJson',
 method: "GET",
 params: { clientID: cId }
 })
.then(function (data) {
     return data.members;
})
};

...
...
data.then(function(response){
    //play with the data
    $scope.data=response
})
share|improve this answer

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