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I'm working on a recursive merge-sort function that uses dynamic memory allocation. I'm reading the data in from a file; first integer is the number of integers, and the rest of the file is the data. I don't seem to be having a problem with reading in the data. I'm not actually displaying the sorted array or anything.. I'm just using clock() to gauge the amount of time it took to complete the mergesort.

For some reason that I have yet to determine, the code works (seemingly) absolutely fine.. so long as the length of the data file I'm reading is of a power of 2; 1, 2, 16, 128, etc. Otherwise, the program exits without any sort of error, seg-fault, etc.. It simply stops. It's worth noting that none of my functions use exit(). It's all returns.

My code for the two functions follows (complete with multiple print statements for the purpose of debugging):

/*
 * Merges array and separates into subarrays
 * so long as size is not equal to 1.
 * Parameters:
 *      int *array,
 *      int l (left)
 *      int m (middle)
 *      int r (right)
 *  Returns:
 *      None
 */
void merge(int *arr, int left, int middle, int right)
{
    int i, j, k;
    int n1 = middle - left + 1;
    int n2 =  right - middle;
    fprintf(stderr, "\nAbout to create temp arrays.\n");
    int *Left = (int *)malloc(n1 * sizeof(int));
    int *Right = (int *)malloc(n2 * sizeof(int));
    fprintf(stderr, "\nAbout to copy data into new temp arrays.\n");
    for(i = 0; i < n1; i++)
        Left[i] = arr[left + i];
   for(j = 0; j <= n2; j++)
        Right[j] = arr[middle + 1+ j];

    i = 0;
    j = 0;
    k = left;
    while (i < n1 && j < n2)
    {
        if (Left[i] <= Right[j])
        {
            arr[k] = Left[i];
            i++;
        }
        else
        {
            arr[k] = Right[j];
            j++;
        }
        k++;
    }   
    fprintf(stderr, "\nHandling the last few elements of whichever array is not completely handled.\n");
    while (i <= n1)
    {
        arr[k] = Left[i];
        i++;
        k++;
    }

    while (j <= n2)
    {
        arr[k] = Right[j];
        j++;
        k++;
    }

    fprintf(stderr, "\nFreeing the subarrays.\n");
    free(Left);
    free(Right);
}


 /* Recursively calls itself until the array size passed is 1.
 * Afterward, calls merge to merge the subarrays back together.
 * Parameters:
 *      int *array
 *      int left (bound)
 *      int right (bound)
 * Returns:
 *      None
 */
void mergeSort(int *arr, int left, int right)
{
    if (left < right)
    {   
        fprintf(stderr, "\nAbout to create middle, the middle point of the current     subarray being sorted.\n");
        int middle = (left + right - 1)/2; //Same as (left+right)/2, but avoids overflow for large left and right
        fprintf(stderr, "\nCalling MergeSort on the left subarray.\n");
        mergeSort(arr, left, middle);
        fprintf(stderr, "\nCalling MergeSort on the right subarray.\n");
        mergeSort(arr, (middle + 1), right);
        fprintf(stderr, "\nCalling Merge on the left and right subarrays.\n");
        merge(arr, left, middle, right);
    }

    return;
}
share|improve this question
    
Have you run it through a debugger, e.g. gdb, with the smallest test case (3 items)? –  Mosby Jul 30 '13 at 17:14
    
I actually haven't been using a debugger, which is pretty silly.. But, I've tried several cases of varying sizes, including 3, 4, 10, 16, and 64.. All of which only allowed the powers of two (4 and 16) to work and give a finishing time. –  Waterbagel Jul 30 '13 at 17:32
    
when you say "length of the data file", do you mean the number of integers to be sorted? I.e., do you mean that the program works only when the first integer in the data file is an even number? –  verbose Jul 30 '13 at 17:54
    
I mean to say that the program only works when the number of integers in the file is a power of two. The program has no problem with the integers themselves, so long as they are within the int length (under 2.1 billion). –  Waterbagel Jul 30 '13 at 18:30
    
Number of integers to be sorted is a power of two, or total number of integers in the file is a power of two? (Since total number of integers in the file is one more than the number to be sorted.) –  verbose Jul 30 '13 at 18:56

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