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I've an R program that outputs a booklet of graphics as a PDF file onto the local server. There's a separate PDF file, an introduction piece, not written in R, that I would like to join my output to.

I can complete this in Adobe and R-bloggers has the process here, both of which involve joining the files by hand, as it were:

http://www.r-bloggers.com/splitting-and-combining-r-pdf-graphics/

But what I'd really prefer to do is just run my code and have the files join. I wasn't able to find similar posts while searching for "[R] Pdf" and "join", "merge", "import pdf", etc..

My intent is to run the code for a different ID number ("Physician") each time. The report will save as a PDF titled by ID number on the server, and the same addendum would be joined to each document.

Here's the current code creating the R report.

Physician<- 1

#creates handle for file name and location using ID
Jumanji<- paste ("X:\\Feedback_ID_", Physician, ".pdf", sep="")

#PDF graphics device on, using file handle
pdf(file=Jumanji,8.5, 11) 

Several plots for this ID occur here and then the PDF is completed with dev.off().

dev.off()

I think I need to pull the outside document into R and reference it in between the opening and closing, but I haven't been successful here.

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migrated from stats.stackexchange.com Jul 30 '13 at 18:05

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8  
If you're on a *nix system, I would use pdftk on the commandline. you can write wrapper functions in R that call out to system if you would rather. –  Justin Jul 30 '13 at 18:08
3  
Besides pdftk which (as @Justin suggests) answers the original question, the whole scenario to me sounds like a typical job for Sweave or knitr. –  cbeleites Jul 30 '13 at 18:22
    
@Justin pdftk works on Windows as well. –  Thomas Jul 30 '13 at 18:27
    
@Thomas oh! Its been a long time since I've used windows for much of anything :) –  Justin Jul 30 '13 at 18:50
    
+1 I didn't know I wanted to do this, but now I see I need to know how! –  ptpaterson Aug 23 '13 at 20:04

1 Answer 1

To do this in R, follow @cbeleites' suggestion (who, I think, is rightly suggesting you move your whole workflow to knitr) to do just this bit in Sweave/knitr. knit the following to pdf, where "test.pdf" is your report that you're appending to, and you'll get the result you want:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{pdfpages}
\begin{document}
\includepdf{test.pdf} % your other document
<<echo=FALSE>>=
x <- rnorm(100)
hist(x)
# or whatever you need to do to get your plot
@
\end{document}

Also, the post you link to seems crazy because it's easy to combine plots into a single pdf in R (in fact it's the default option). Simply leave the pdf device open with its parameter onefile=TRUE (the default).

x <- rnorm(100)
y <- rnorm(100)
pdf("test.pdf")
hist(x)
hist(y)
dev.off()

Plots will automatically get paginated.

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+1 simple but great examples. –  ptpaterson Aug 23 '13 at 20:04

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