Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

In my app.js I have the following to try to retrieve data from a sqlite database and pass it to one of my views:

app.get("/dynamic", function(req, res) {
    var db = new sqlite3.Database(mainDatabase)
    var posts = []

    db.serialize(function() {
        db.each("SELECT * FROM blog_posts", function(err, row) {
            posts.push({title: row.post_title, date: row.post_date, text: row.post_text})
        })
    })

    res.render("dynamic", {title: "Dynamic", posts: posts})
})

Can someone tell me what I am doing wrong here. The posts array seems to stay empty nomatter what.

EDIT I was following a tutorial that explained that though the plugin has async, this method is not asynchronous

Here is a quote from the tutorial

Despite the callbacks and asynchronous nature of Node.js, these transactions will run in series, allowing us to create, insert, and query knowing that the statement prior will run before the current one does. However, sqlite3 provides a "parallel" wrapper with the same interface, but runs all the transactions in parallel. It just all depends on your current circumstances.

share|improve this question
    
Regarding your edit: serialize != synchronous. serialize just places the queries in a queue and delays the start of each until the previous query has completed. So, you can count on them occurring in order rather than in parallel/all-at-once, but each query still executes asynchronously. –  Jonathan Lonowski Jul 30 '13 at 19:02
    
Thankyou for clearing that up. –  Carson Evans Jul 30 '13 at 19:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

the db calls are likely asynchronous. Which means you are rendering before they return with their data.

You need to figure out how to get one callback from your query, and render your template in that callback.

It looks like you want a second complete callback passed to db.each() (Thanks, Jonathan Lonowski, for the tip!)

var posts = [];
db.serialize(function() {
    db.each("SELECT * FROM blog_posts", function(err, row) {
        posts.push({title: row.post_title, date: row.post_date, text: row.post_text})
    }, function() {
        // All done fetching records, render response
        res.render("dynamic", {title: "Dynamic", posts: posts})
    })
})

The idea is the render in the last callback of any asynchronous code, that way you have everything you need.


share|improve this answer
    
I thought at first it might be something to do with it being asynchronous and it probably is. I just thought this would work because doing console.log(row.post_title+" "+row.post_text+" "+row.post_date) will print the info perfectly fine in the console –  Carson Evans Jul 30 '13 at 18:52
1  
@CarsonEvans Yeah but that console.log() call would happen after the page was rendered. In your original code, res.render() is called, then after that the db query returns a result. –  Alex Wayne Jul 30 '13 at 18:54
    
Thankyou so much!! It worked. I am going to have to remember this i nthe future as I do more. –  Carson Evans Jul 30 '13 at 19:03
    
Two things: 1 - Why do you use serialize? Its only applicable for updates / inserts. 2 - Use the all method instead of each. It returns an array of all rows, and saves you the trouble. As i see it, one should use some kind of async rendering, to optimize this, but thats a hole different story. –  Jesper Jensen Sep 21 '14 at 8:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.