Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to make a helper function that executes a lambda/std::function when called if the given weak_ptr is valid. Currently the following code works, but unfortunately, it requires me to define the template parameters. I'm looking for a way to do this with automatic template argument deduction.

template <typename DependentType, typename... ArgumentTypes>
auto make_dependent(std::weak_ptr<DependentType>& dependent, std::function < void(ArgumentTypes...)> functor) -> decltype(functor)
{
    return [&dependent, functor] (ArgumentTypes... args)
    {
        if (!dependent.expired()) {
            functor(args...);
        }
    };
};

Ideally, I would like to replace the std::function <void(ArgumentTypes...)> with a generic template parameter FunctorType, but then I'm not sure how I would extract arguments from FunctorType. The above code works, the below code is theoretical:

template <typename DependentType, typename FunctorType>
auto make_dependent_ideal(std::weak_ptr<DependentType>& dependent, FunctorType functor) -> decltype(std::function<return_value(functor)(argument_list(functor))>)
{
    return[&dependent, functor](argument_list(functor) args)
    {
        if (!dependent.expired()) {
            functor(args...);
        }
    }
}

Is there any way to do something like this?

share|improve this question
    
If you put DependentType after ArgumentTypes you will only have to specify ArgumentTypes, since DependentType is deducible. –  Casey Jul 30 '13 at 23:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The easiest way to solve your problem with extracting arguments from your parameter is to not extract the arguments from your parameter.

template<typename F, typename C>
struct conditional_forwarder {
  F func;
  C cond;
  template<typename Fin, typename Cin>
  conditional_forwarder( Fin&& f, Cin&& c ):
    func(std::forward<Fin>(f)), cond(std::forward<Cin>(c)) {}
  template<typename... Args>
  void operator()( Args&&... args ) const {
    if (cond())
      func( std::forward<Args>(args)... );
  }
};
template<typename F, typename C>
conditional_forwarder< typename std::decay<F>::type, typename std::decay<C>::type >
make_conditional_forwarder( F&& f, C&& c ) {
  return {std::forward<F>(f), std::forward<C>(c)};
}
// todo: make_dependent_test   

template <typename DependentType, typename FunctorType>
auto make_dependent_ideal(std::weak_ptr<DependentType>& dependent, FunctorType functor)
  -> decltype(make_conditional_forwarder( make_dependent_test(dependent), functor) )
{
  return make_conditional_forwarder( make_dependent_test(dependent), functor);
}

much of this will be easier in C++14.

As an aside, there seems to be a fundamental design flaw: the conditional forwarder should probably aquire a .lock() on the weak_ptr, and then execute functor within that lock, so that the precondition (that the resource is held) holds for the entire call of functor.

I'm also unsure why you are holding a reference to a weak_ptr, when the remote state of a weak_ptr can be copied.

In C++14, you can return something like:

return [=](auto&&... args) mutable {
}

I believe, and the decltype stuff also goes away mostly as functions can deduce their return type more easily.

share|improve this answer
    
What does [=](auto&&... args) mutable {} mean? Both the parameters part and the mutable part confuses me. –  LB-- Oct 6 '13 at 23:17
    
@LB-- Parameters are implicitly typed, a C++14 feature I believe. mutable is a C++11 modifier to a lambda that means the operator() on the generated lambda can modify its captured variables. –  Yakk Oct 7 '13 at 0:42

Here's how I'd solve your problem in C++14:

template<typename DependentType, typename FunctorType>
auto make_dependent(std::weak_ptr<DependentType> &dependent, FunctorType functor) {
  return [&dependent, functor](auto &&...args) {
    if (!dependent.expired())
      functor(std::forward<decltype(args)>(args)...);
  }
}

I'm using two C++14 features here:

  • Deduced return type for make_dependent
  • A variadic generic lambda with perfect forwarding to call the inner functor

EDIT: The code above captures dependent by reference, as your original code did. Is that really what you want?

share|improve this answer

You can use a proxy trait class to extract the return type and arguments separately from a single template parameter. The Trait class uses the static function dependent_func to create the lambda you want to return.

template <typename DependentType, typename FunctorType>
struct Trait {};

template <typename DependentType, typename ReturnType, typename... ArgumentTypes>
struct Trait<DependentType, std::function<ReturnType(ArgumentTypes...)>> {
    static std::function<ReturnType(ArgumentTypes...)> dependent_func(const std::weak_ptr<DependentType>& dependent, std::function<ReturnType(ArgumentTypes...)>& functor) {
        return [&dependent, &functor] (ArgumentTypes... args) {
            if (!dependent.expired()) {
                return functor(args...);
            }
        };
    }
};

template <typename DependentType, typename FunctorType>
auto make_dependent_ideal(std::weak_ptr<DependentType>& dependent, FunctorType& functor) -> decltype(Trait<DependentType, FunctorType>::dependent_func(dependent, functor)) {
    return Trait<DependentType, FunctorType>::dependent_func(dependent, functor);
}

For more info about parsing template arguments in this way, look at this question: C++ parsing function-type template argument

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.