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I am trying to write a testable Laravel 4 application. In Taylor Otwells book on Laravel https://leanpub.com/laravel he writes that we should consider creating a UserValidator class within a Validation namespace and inject that validator into your repository. Could you please provide a code example of the code would look like in the controller, repository and tests. If the user input is unsatisfactory should I throw a Validation exception in the repository and catch the errors in the controller? http://jasonlewis.me/article/laravel-advanced-validation

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1  
Note, the link provided at the end is related to Laravel 3, not Laravel 4. –  Rubens Mariuzzo Jul 31 '13 at 4:35

2 Answers 2

Personally, I prefer to do the validation directly in the model. That say, I would have for each model a getValidator() method as follows:

class User extends Eloquent
{
    public function getValidator()
    {
        $params = array(
            'username' => $this->username,
            'password' => $this->password,
        );

        $rules = array(
            'username' => ['required', 'unique:users'],
            'password' => ['required', 'min:6'],
        );

        return Validator::make($params, $rules);
    }
}

Then in my controllers, commands or test I would just call that method to have a validator instance and then I would call the method I need, that could be passes() or fails().

The following illustrate how I actually use it in a controller.

class UserController extends BaseController
{
    public function processCreateUser()
    {
        // Retrieve user input.
        $user = new User(Input::all());

        // Validate input.
        $validator = $user->getValidator();

        if ($validator->passes()) 
        {
            // Hash the password.
            $user->password = Hash::make($user->password);

            // Save the new user.
            $user->save();

            return Redirect::to('users')
                ->with('success', 'User created!');
        }

        return Redirect::route('users.create')
            ->withInput()
            ->with('error', 'Cannot create user, please double check the form.')
            ->withErrors($validator);
    }
}
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2  
In no way has this answer, touched on anything the original question asked for! –  JasonMortonNZ Jul 31 '13 at 5:06
    
@JasonMortonNZ, I agree with you. But the last link provided by the OP talk about implementing validation directly in the model instead of using repository. So I tough that this answer base on my personal experience could be of interest to the OP. –  Rubens Mariuzzo Jul 31 '13 at 5:25

I recently coded something similar to this, which was recommended by laracasts (http://laracasts.com) (which referenced Taylor Otwell's book). Please note that you do not have to follow the application structure utilized.

<?php namespace ACME\Services\Validation;

use Validator as V;

abstract class Validator {

    protected $errormessages;
    protected $rules;

    public function validate($input, $rules)
    {

        $validator = V::make($input, $rules);
        $this->rules = $rules;

        if ($validator->fails()) {

            $this->errormessages = $validator->messages();

            return false;
        }

        return true;

    }

    public function getErrorMessages()
    {
        return $this->errormessages;
    }

    public function getValidationRules()
    {
        return $this->rules;
    }
}

This is the class that should be extended for various validation purposes, as demonstrated in the example code snippet below.

<?php namespace ACME\Services\Validation;

use Auth;

class UserValidator extends Validator {

    protected $create_rules = [
        'firstname' => 'required|min:3|max:64|alpha-dash',
        'lastname' => 'required|min:2|max:64|alpha-dash',
        'account' => 'required|min:4|max:15|alpha_num',
        'email' => 'required|between:3,254|email|unique:users',
        'description' => 'max:500'
    ];

    protected $edit_rules = [
        'firstname' => 'required|min:3|max:64|alpha-dash',
        'lastname' => 'required|min:2|max:64|alpha-dash',
        'description' => 'max:500'
    ];

    protected $pass_edit_rules = [
        'oldpassword' => 'required',
        'password'  => 'required|min:5|confirmed',
        'password_confirmation'=> 'required|min:5'
    ];

    public function validateCreate($input)
    {


        return parent::validate($input, $this->create_rules);
    }

    public function validateEdit($input)
    {
        $newRules = $this->edit_rules;

        if ($this->validatePasswordChanged($input))
            $newRules = array_merge($newRules, $this->pass_edit_rules);

        return parent::validate($input, $newRules);
    }

    public function validatePasswordChanged($input)
    {
        return $input['password'] != '' || $input['oldpassword'] != '' || $input['password_confirmation'] != '' ? true : false;
    }

}

$this->validate could have been used just as easily as parent::validate within the class.

Another example, since laracasts provides lessons, they may have a LessonValidator.php file that contains class LessonValidator extends Validator {} with a different set of rules.

Use within an repository? The repository interface and service provider is excluded

<?php namespace ACME\Repositories;

use User;
use UserController;
use ACME\Services\Validation\UserValidator;

class DatabaseUserRepository extendes UserRepositoryInterface {
    protected $validator;

    public function __construct(UserValidator $validator, UserController $listener)
    {
        $this->validator = $validator;
        $this->listener = $listener;
    }

    public function createUser(User $user)
    {
        if ($this->validator->validateCreate($input))
            return $this->listener->withErrors('/',$this->validator->getErrorMessages());

        /* Validation passed, create user with User::create() */

        $this->listener->withView('usercreatedview');
    }
}

Your controller would then contain something along the lines of.

<?php

use ACME\Repositories\UserRepositoryInterface;

class UserController extends BaseController {

    protected $repository;

    public function __construct(UserRepositoryInterface $repository)
    {
        $this->repository = $repository;
    }

    public function withErrors($path, MessageBag $errors)
    {
        return Redirect::to($path)->withErrors($errors);
    }

    public function withView($view)
    {
        return View::make($view);
    }

    /* Other controller stuff... */
}

Please note that this would error out if you do not bind DatabaseUserRepository to UserRepositoryInterface (and any typos I may have made). You could've injected the validation class into the controller, but I believe you wanted to incorporate a repository. I tend to do my validation and repository calls inside of event handlers.

I would read up on psr autoloading, dependency injection, and creating custom service providers.

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1  
The controller should call the repository, not the other way around. Repository encapsulates the set of objects persisted in a data store and the operations performed over them, providing a more object-oriented view of the persistence layer. See Martin Fowler's P of EAA Catalog –  Torkil Johnsen Apr 15 at 11:43
    
The repository does not call the controller, it simply notifies a listener of its results, which happens to be the controller. Matt Wynne demonstrated it at the Gotham Ruby Conference, and Jeffrey Way did sort of a translation to Laravel in his "Controller Cleanup" screen cast. –  Verron Knowles Jun 6 at 13:42
    
If Matt Wynne simply followed what "should" be done, he wouldn't of stuck with his passive controller idea. References: vimeo.com/44807822 - laracasts.com/lessons/controller-cleanup –  Verron Knowles Jun 6 at 14:02
1  
@VerronKnowles , I like the answer. It's a delegate approach. Ignore Torkil. –  Jake Toolson Jun 22 at 3:09

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