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In a project I am working on, I create an AppDomain and tell it to load the currently executing assembly. I then invoke Activator.CreateInstanceFrom to create a marshalled instance of an internal class (of type MyType) as such (and you can see it also uses the same assembly location):

        ObjectHandle handle = Activator.CreateInstanceFrom(
            Factory.operatingDomain,
            Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location,
            typeof(MyType).FullName,
            false,
            BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance,
            null,
            new object[] { config },
            null,
            null);

Everything works alright when I unit test this assembly, but using it in an ASP.NET debug environment, it throws a MissingMethodException. I took the time to create my own class that extends Binder to see what happens. The only difference seems to be that in the debug environment, the parameter passed in (config) gets its type from the assembly located in the regular directory, while the ParameterInfo object gets its type from the assembly located in the ASP.NET temporary folder.

Even if I passed typeof(config).Assembly.Location, I would get the same result. So it is something internal to the framework.

Is there anything I can do to correct this, other than keeping a niche-use internally-accessible custom binder that returns true when the parameter types match according to FullName?

UPDATE

I have tried passing the location of the assembly as taken from the app domain's loaded assemblies and still no dice. My custom binder didn't work, either -- it needed me to implement Binder.ChangeType where I discovered that I couldn't even cast from one type to the other (even though, as stated, the only difference between them is the location of the assembly.)

UPDATE 2

I tried the following code to ensure that the app domain was loading the proper assembly from the proper location:

        if (binPath != String.Empty)
        {
            Factory.operatingDomain.SetData("assemblyLocation", Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location);

            Factory.operatingDomain.DoCallBack(() =>
            {
                String location = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetData("assemblyLocation").ToString();
                String filename = System.IO.Path.GetFileName(location);
                List<String> paths = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.RelativeSearchPath.Split(';').ToList();

                foreach (String path in paths.ToArray())
                {
                    paths.Remove(path);
                    paths.AddRange(System.IO.Directory.GetFiles(path, filename));
                }

                Assembly.LoadFrom(paths[0]);
            });
        }

And it was right! It loaded the right assembly! But here, just a little later:

String location = Factory.operatingDomain
                         .GetAssemblies()
                         .Single(a => a.FullName == Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().FullName)
                         .Location;

This returns the .NET temporary folder path. That is not right. I would consider this a bug in the framework!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The .NET framework does not seem to properly resolve assembly locations when you ask an app domain for one of its assembly locations. To work around this, I had to probe for the assembly myself:

        // This code I was already using:
        String binPath = String.Empty;

        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.RelativeSearchPath))
        {
            String[] paths = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.RelativeSearchPath.Split(';');

            for (var i = 0; i < paths.Length; i++)
            {
                paths[i].Remove(0, AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory.Length);
            }

            binPath = String.Join(";", paths);
        }

        Factory.operatingDomain = AppDomain.CreateDomain("my_remote_domain", null,
            new AppDomainSetup
            {
                ApplicationBase = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory,
                // Sometimes, like in a web app, your bin folder is not the same
                // as the base dir.
                PrivateBinPath = binPath
            });

        // The new code that solved my problem begins here:
        if (binPath != String.Empty)
        {
            Factory.operatingDomain.SetData("assemblyLocation", Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location);

            Factory.operatingDomain.DoCallBack(() =>
            {
                String location = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetData("assemblyLocation").ToString();
                String filename = System.IO.Path.GetFileName(location);
                List<String> paths = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.RelativeSearchPath.Split(';').ToList();

                foreach (String path in paths.ToArray())
                {
                    paths.Remove(path);
                    paths.AddRange(System.IO.Directory.GetFiles(path, filename));
                }

                Assembly.LoadFrom(paths[0]);

                AppDomain.CurrentDomain.SetData("assemblyLocation", paths[0]);
            });

            Factory.realAssemblyLocation = Factory.operatingDomain.GetData("assemblyLocation").ToString();
        }
        else
        {
            Factory.operatingDomain.Load(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().FullName);
        }

And then when I try to create instances of a remote object, I do this:

        String location = Factory.realAssemblyLocation ?? Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location;

        ObjectHandle handle = Activator.CreateInstanceFrom(
            Factory.operatingDomain,
            location,
            typeof(MyType).FullName,
            false,
            BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance,
            null,
            new object[] { config },
            null,
            null);

UPDATE 4/16/2014

As it turns out, all I really had to do was set the ApplicationBase of the new AppDomain to the directory that contained the currently executing assembly. Much simpler :)

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What is your application? ASP.NET application? If it is you should be aware of a beast named assembly shadow copy (see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms404279.aspx). This thing is used by default in ASP.NET. In short when you use an assembly located in bin folder along with the ASP.NET application assembly it gets copied into ASP.NET temporary folder and loaded from there.

To make sure that this is what causes the behavior you experience try placing your assembly that defines the type of "config" parameter into some separate folder and load the assembly by catching the AppDomain_AssemblyResolve event or load it manually before you use it. This way you will neglect the assembly shadowcopy behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
Upvoted for bringing up shadow copying, but what seemed to happen is that the AppDomain was already loading the assembly from the desired location; however, calling Activator.CreateInstanceFrom causes the AppDomain to look in the given assembly location for the type to instantiate. So the AppDomain loaded assembly from location A as desired, but CreateInstanceFrom needs that same location A. The problem is really that even though the AppDomain loaded from location A, if I asked it for its assemblies and checked their location, it gave me location B instead. –  tuespetre Jul 31 '13 at 17:47
    
The reason the config was getting the type from the correct location was because Activator.CreateInstanceFrom serializes the parameters into the AppDomain, and the AppDomain loaded the assembly from the right location. –  tuespetre Jul 31 '13 at 17:49

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