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With stylesheets it would be nice if there was a way to associate classes in the stylesheet. For example, if I have a class called fruit, and a class called apple, it would be great if I could say that the apple was also a fruit.

I know that this can be done like so from the HTML:

<div class="apple fruit"></div>

But I would have to add this EVERY single time. What about solely in the stylesheet side?

<div class="apple"></div>
<div class="fruit"></div>

It seems like it would make more sense for the stylesheet (with minimum coding) to associate that the apple is also a fruit.

Possible solutions:

  • I could probably use javascript to add the class fruit whenever there is the class apple.

  • Another solution might be to have some sort of shorthand notation, and then compile the stylesheet.

Any other solutions? Perhaps more elegant?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should look at CSS preprocessors (LESS, Sass, Stylus). They provide ways to extend styles just as you'd expect.

Output CSS

  .fruit, .apple, .orange {
    border: 2px solid green;
  }

  .apple {
    background-color: red;
  }

  .orange {
    background-color: orange;
  }

LESS

  .fruit {
    border: 2px solid green;
  }

  .apple {
    &:extend(.fruit);
    background-color: red;
  }

  .orange {
    &:extend(.fruit);
    background-color: orange;
  }

SASS and Stylus

  .fruit {
    border: 2px solid green;
  }

  .apple {
    @extend .fruit;
    background-color: red;
  }

  .apple {
    @extend .fruit;
    background-color: orange;
  }
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.fruit, .apple {
    whatever: value;
}
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If you have a rule

.fruit { color: green }

you can always attach other selectors after a comma:

.fruit, .apple { color: green }

There's no real inheritance of traits here, just duplication.

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Check out http://lesscss.org/

I know it has nested styles, which should suit your needs.

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You could define this directly in you CSS file like this:

.fruite, .apple, .raspberry {
  // styles for fruites
  font-weight: bold;
}

.apple {
  // special style for apples
  color: #0F0;
}

.raspberry {
  // special style for raspberries
  color: #F00;
}

Now, when you use .apple this element is also a fruite and has the special style rules from apple. And you can also use .fruite and the element will only be a global fruite.

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I see, so looking at it the other direction, instead of saying apple belongs to fruite, you maintain a list of all the selectors that share the same styles. The same work, just in different places. –  Biagio Arobba Jul 31 '13 at 15:13

There are many ways to achieve this using 3rd party pluginins like http://lesscss.org/, but I think the best way we can achieve this is plan out the css structure, the OO way.

For example fruit might have some sharing attributes, and the apple class will have some distinction.

.fruit { font-size: 12px, border:none}
.apple { color: red }

There are a few interesting articles written on this, the challenging part is planning for it. Who wants to spend extra time on CSS planning, especially designer just pop up some new ideas during UAT, or user might want to change the design last minute which could break the entire structure.

http://www.vanseodesign.com/css/object-oriented-css/

http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/html-css-techniques/object-oriented-css-what-how-and-why/

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All you can really do is let things "Cascade." If all .fruit have .5em padding then you have a reusable class. Deciding on what things are going to be reusable is key. Now if stone-fruit are all round, then you can have a reusable .stone-fuit class. If some of the fruit are red, then you can have .red or something. There is a battle between the 2 ways of thinking. Some people are afraid to use too many classes in their HTML - but their is a happy medium. I use variables quite a lot with SASS - and You could look into OOCSS. In this case your rules and selectors could read:

CSS

.fruit {
    padding: .5em;
}

.stone-fruit {
    -webkit-border-radius: 100%;
    border-radius: 100%;
}

.red {
    background-color: red;
}

HTML

<div class="fruit stone-fruit red">red stone fruit</div>
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