Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can I construct an std::map where the key type is a reference type, e.g. Foo & and if not, why not?

share|improve this question
    
+1 this is a good question that many are afraid to ask. –  laura Nov 25 '09 at 10:52
1  
Not directly, but boost::reference_wrapper<Foo> should work. It has an implicit conversion to Foo& –  MSalters Nov 26 '09 at 10:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

According to C++ Standard 23.1.2/7 key_type should be assignable. Reference type is not.

share|improve this answer

No, because many of the functions in std::map takes a reference to the keytype and references to references are illegal in C++.

/A.B.

share|improve this answer

Consider the operator[](const key_type & key). If key_type is Foo & then what is const key_type &? The thing is that it does not work. You can not construct an std::map where the key type is a reference type.

share|improve this answer

Pointer as a key-type for std::map is perfectly legal

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <map>

using namespace std;


int main()
{
int a = 2;
int b = 3;
int * c =  &a;
int * d =  &b;
map<int *, int> M;

M[c]=356;
M[d]=78;
return 0;
}

Initialised references cant be keys:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <map>

using namespace std;


int main()
{
int a = 2;
int b = 3;
int & c =  a;
int & d =  b;
map<int &, int> M;

M[c]=356;
M[d]=78;
return 0;
}
In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.4/map:60,
                 from test.cpp:3:
/usr/include/c++/4.4/bits/stl_tree.h: In instantiation of 'std::_Rb_tree<int&, std::pair<int&, int>, std::_Select1st<std::pair<int&, int> >, std::less<int&>, std::allocator<std::pair<int&, int> > >':
/usr/include/c++/4.4/bits/stl_map.h:128:   instantiated from 'std::map<int&, int, std::less<int&>, std::allocator<std::pair<int&, int> > >'
test.cpp:14:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.4/bits/stl_tree.h:1407: error: forming pointer to reference type 'int&

'

share|improve this answer
1  
Keep in mind that ordering based on pointers is non-deterministic and likely to change with each invocation of the program. –  Rob K Nov 25 '09 at 15:16
    
Not to mention that keys are compared for equality, and so this is comparing the pointer address values when doing a lookup, and not comparison of the pointer-to value. Specifically, in this example if there were another int e = 2, and you looked up M[&e], you would not get what you might think you are looking for. –  mmocny Oct 23 '10 at 5:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.