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I'm writing a small django command to copy data from a json API endpoint into a Django database. At the point I actually create the objects, with obj, created = model.objects.get_or_create(**filters), I am getting a MultipleObjectsReturned error. This is surprising to me, because my understanding of get_or_create is that if I try to create an object that already exists, it will just 'get' it instead.

I'm not certain about the integrity of the database I'm cloning, but even if there are multiple identical objects in it, when I load them into my local Django database, shouldn't get_or_create make it so that I never get more than one copy?

Can anybody explain this? I'm happy to give more specifics, I just didn't want to bog the reader down.

share|improve this question
    
get search for an unique element if there are more elements it raises the error MultipleObjectsReturned, filter search for a lot of elements and returns a list of them. – Victor Castillo Torres Jul 31 '13 at 2:45
1  
A comparative is here stackoverflow.com/questions/1541249/… – Victor Castillo Torres Jul 31 '13 at 2:57
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As the name implies, get_or_create model.objects.get()s or model.objects.create()s.

It's conceptually equivalent to:

try:
   model.objects.get(pk=1)
except model.DoesNotExist:
   model.objects.create(pk=1)

The source is where you find definitive answers to these types of questions. Hint: search def get_or_create. As you can see, this function only catches DoesNotExist in the try/except.

def get_or_create(self, **kwargs):
    """
    Looks up an object with the given kwargs, creating one if necessary.
    Returns a tuple of (object, created), where created is a boolean
    specifying whether an object was created.
    """
    assert kwargs, \
            'get_or_create() must be passed at least one keyword argument'
    defaults = kwargs.pop('defaults', {})
    lookup = kwargs.copy()
    for f in self.model._meta.fields:
        if f.attname in lookup:
            lookup[f.name] = lookup.pop(f.attname)
    try:
        self._for_write = True
        return self.get(**lookup), False
    except self.model.DoesNotExist:
share|improve this answer
    
Right, my question was really more a thinking-through-it type than anything else. I see that get_or_create only catches DoesNotExist. But shouldn't it self.get(**lookup) if it DOES exist? If so, how could my script ever create the second object--thus how could I get the MultipleObjectsReturned exception? – Brian Peterson Jul 31 '13 at 6:52
    
Thanks for explaining how get_or_create works, though. – Brian Peterson Jul 31 '13 at 6:53
1  
@bepetersn you could get a duplicate depending on how you're populating the query kwargs (this has actually happened to me): get_or_create(name=foo), get_or_create(name=foo, bar=bar), get_or_create(name=foo) # multiple – Yuji 'Tomita' Tomita Jul 31 '13 at 17:06
    
Ah, I see! So I created two different objects (b/c of different numbers of params) with create(), then when I tried to get() using only specific enough parameters to narrow down the search to those two objects, I get an error. So, in essence, get(**params) is literally only filtering the database. Sort of like a select-where SQL statement. – Brian Peterson Jul 31 '13 at 19:32
1  
@Bepetersn, good find - exactly. Getting or creating with more params will cause duplicates of a single parameter. NP man! – Yuji 'Tomita' Tomita Jul 31 '13 at 20:03

Example code

Imagine you have the following model:

class DictionaryEntry(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=255, null=False, blank=False)
    definition = models.TextField(null=True, blank=False)

and the following code:

obj, created = DictionaryEntry.objects.get_or_create(
    name='apple', definition='some kind of fruit')

get_or_create

In case you have not seen the code for get_or_create:

 # simplified
 def get_or_create(cls, **kwargs):
     try:
         instance, created = cls.get(**kwargs), False
     except cls.DoesNotExist:
         instance, created = cls.create(**kwargs), True
     return instance, created

about webservers...

Now imagine that you have a webserver with 2 worker processes that both have their own concurrent access to the database.

 # simplified
 def get_or_create(cls, **kwargs):
     try:
         instance, created = cls.get(**kwargs), False # <===== nope not there...
     except cls.DoesNotExist:
         instance, created = cls.create(**kwargs), True
     return instance, created

If the timing goes right (or wrong depending on how you want to phrase this), both processes can do the lookup and not find the item. They may both create the item. Everything is fine...

MultipleObjectsReturned: get() returned more than one KeyValue -- it returned 2!

Everything is fine... until you call get_or_create a third time, "third time is a charm" they say.

 # simplified
 def get_or_create(cls, **kwargs):
     try:
         instance, created = cls.get(**kwargs), False # <==== kaboom, 2 objects.
     except cls.DoesNotExist:
         instance, created = cls.create(**kwargs), True
     return instance, created

unique_together

How could you solve this? Maybe enforce a constraint at the database level:

class DictionaryEntry(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=255, null=False, blank=False)
    definition = models.TextField(null=True, blank=False)
    class Meta:
        unique_together = (('name', 'definition'),)

back to the function:

 # simplified
 def get_or_create(cls, **kwargs):
     try:
         instance, created = cls.get(**kwargs), False
     except cls.DoesNotExist:
         instance, created = cls.create(**kwargs), True # <==== this handles IntegrityError
     return instance, created

Say you have the same race as before, and they both did not find the item and proceed to the insert; doing so they will start a transaction and one of them is going to win the race while the other will see an IntegrityError.

mysql ?

The example uses a TextField, which for mysql translates to a LONGTEXT (in my case). Adding the unique_together constraint fails the syncdb.

django.db.utils.InternalError: (1170, u"BLOB/TEXT column 'definition' used in key specification without a key length")

So, no luck, you may have to deal with MultipleObjectsReturned manually.

possible solutions

  • It may be possible to replace the TextField with a CharField.
  • It may be possible to add a CharField which may be a strong hash of the TextField, that you can compute in pre_save and use in a unique_together.
share|improve this answer

Another situation that could cause MultipleObjectsReturned error with get_or_create() API seems to be if there are multiple threads calling this API at the same time with the same set of query parameters.

Solely relying on try... catch... to create a unique row in Python wouldn't work. If you are trying to use this API, I think you should have a matching uniqueness constraint on the appropriate columns in the database.

See: https://code.djangoproject.com/ticket/12579

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