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I wrote this to calculate the minimum number of bills and coins needed to make change. Can this be done using a loop?

def user_change(balance):
        twen = int(balance/20)
        balance=balance%20
        ten = int(balance/10)
        balance=balance%10
        five = int(balance/5)
        balance = balance%5
        ones = int(balance/1)
        balance = balance%1
        quart = int( balance/0.25)
        balance = balance%0.25
        dime = int(balance/0.10)
        balance = balance%0.10
        nickel = int(balance/0.05)
        balance = balance%0.05
        pennies = int(balance/0.05)
        print twen
        print ten
        print five
        print ones
        print quart
        print dime
        print nickel
        print pennies

    user_change(34.36) 
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To answer your question: yes it can ;) –  Verma Jul 31 '13 at 3:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT: updated answer per roippi@ suggestion:

from collections import OrderedDict

_currency_values = [ 
    ('twenties',20),
    ('tens',10),
    ('fives',5),
    ('ones',1),
    ('quarters',0.25),
    ('dimes',0.10),
    ('nickels',0.05),
    ('pennies',0.01),
]
currency_values = OrderedDict(_currency_values)

def user_change(balance):
    user_change_results = []
    for currency in currency_values.keys():
        #print balance
        if balance == 0:
            break
        currency_amount = currency_values[currency]
        currency_change_amount = balance//currency_amount
        user_change_results.append((currency,currency_change_amount))
        balance-=(currency_change_amount*currency_amount)

    return user_change_results

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print user_change(34.36)

ORIGINAL RESPONSE:

Here's my approach. Similar to roippi@ but with descriptors for each currency amount:

currency_values = {
    'twenties' : 20,
    'tens' : 10,
    'fives' : 5,
    'ones' : 1,
    'quarters' : 0.25,
    'dimes' : 0.10,
    'nickels' : 0.05,
    'pennies' : 0.01,
}

currency_order = ['twenties','tens','fives','ones','quarters','dimes','nickels','pennies']

def user_change(balance):
    user_change_results = []
    for currency in currency_order:
        #print balance
        if balance == 0:
            break
        currency_amount = currency_values[currency]
        currency_change_amount = balance//currency_amount
        user_change_results.append((currency,currency_change_amount))
        balance-=(currency_change_amount*currency_amount)

    return user_change_results

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print user_change(34.36)
share|improve this answer
    
I don't hate this approach, but I would use an ordereddict instead of specifying a list solely to provide a key iteration order. –  roippi Jul 31 '13 at 22:20
    
Not a bad idea...updating my answer. –  AJ. Aug 1 '13 at 19:49

This is a good time (okay it's always a good time) to make things easier on yourself and first think about data structures. You have a list of currency (keys) that, for each key, you want to find one unique amount for (value). k:v pairings mean a dict, so fill one up in lieu of just printing the value; you can always print later...

def make_change(bal):
    currency = [20,10,5,1,.25,.1,.05,.01]
    change = {}
    for unit in currency:
        change[unit] = int(bal // unit)
        bal %= unit
    return change

(whenever you get to use the %= operator you should feel cool)

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Yes it can. Look at the repetition of

x=int(balance/N)
balance=balance%N

Put your N's in a list, and loop over them collecting your x's into another list.
For advanced credit use map.

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This isn't really a pure map since balance gets updated as a side-effect. Depends on your persuasion as to whether that's a bad thing. –  J. Abrahamson Jul 31 '13 at 3:21

Sure, let's just make a list of the values and map over it.

def user_change(balance):
  values = [20, 10, 5, 1, 0.25, 0.10, 0.05, 0.01]
  for value in values:
    print(int(balance/value))
    balance = balance % value
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